archive

Archives du blog

Namur, April 11, 2018

There are some words that we try in vain to translate but do not manage to clarify satisfactorily. This is the case with the English words policy and policies. We can, of course, get close to the meaning when, in French, we allude to une politique [1] or les politiques publiques. Except that policy does not necessarily relate to a political context [2] and does not always belong to the register of the public arena. The Oxford English Dictionary defines policy as a course or principle of action adopted or proposed by an organisation or individual [3]. Policies can therefore be organisational, corporate, individual or collective, and can assume multiple forms, from intention to action, including streams of ideas and their execution in legislation, regulatory implementation and everyday changes [4]. For a long time, the Anglo-Saxon academic world has adopted the distinction between politics and policies, indicating moreover that policies may be public. Thus the London School of Economics and Political Science distinguishes between British Politics and Policy and UK Government, Politics and Policy [5].

 

1. Intentions, decisions, objectives and implementation

Drawing its inspiration from the works of theorists in the concept, especially the Yale University professors Harold Dwight Lasswell (1902-1978) [6] and Aaron Wildavsky (1930-1993) [7], the Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration (ed. 2015) defines Policy as a decision or, more broadly, a series of interlinked decisions relating to a range of objectives and the means of implementing them. The author of the definition, William H. Park, a lecturer and researcher at a British military academy [8], states that this process involves identifying a problem that requires a solution or an objective that is worth achieving, evaluating the alternative means of attaining the desired results, choosing between these alternatives and implementing the preferred option, in addition to solving the problem or achieving the objective. Park observes that such a process should entail the participation of a limited number of decision-makers, a high degree of consensus on what constitutes a policy problem or a desirable objective, a capacity for evaluating and comparing the probable consequences of each of the alternatives, a smooth implementation of the chosen option and the absence of any impediments to achieving the objectives. This also implies that this process ends with the execution and implementation of the decision [9]. Clearly, however difficult it may be to grasp the notion, it is above all the rationality of the process that seems to characterise it [10]. There is also the fact that, as Lasswell points out, policy approaches tend toward contextuality in place of fragmentation and toward problem-oriented not problem-blind perspectives [11]. This second consideration points to the systemic aspect, which we prioritise in foresight – even if it is beyond the context. Furthermore, according to the Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, policy studies and foresight share the characteristic of being explicitly normative and fundamentally action-oriented [12]. They are also normative because they rely on values that determine their objectives. In what Yehezkel Dror calls Grand Policies, the common good, the public interest and the good of humanity as a whole, or raison d’humanité, are pursued to highlight strategies. As the former professor of political science and politics at Harvard and the University of Jerusalem points out, Grand Policies try to reduce the probability of bad futures, to increase the probability of good futures, as their images and evaluations change with time, and to gear up to coping with the unforeseen and the unforeseeable[13]. Unsurprisingly, to achieve this, Dror particularly recommends engaging in thinking-in-History and practising foresight [14].

2. In governance: identifying and organising the actors

Democratic governance, in other words governance by the actors, – including the Administration [15] –, particularly as highlighted since the early 1990s by the Club of Rome and the United Nations Development Programme[16], also shows, as sociologist Patrice Duran has pointed out, that government institutions have lost their monopoly on governance [17]. This observation was also made by David Richards and Martin J. Smith in their analysis of the links between governance and public policy in the United Kingdom. For these two British political scientists, governance demands that we consider all the actors and locations beyond the « core executive » involved in the policy making process [18]. If we take proper account of this trend, we can make a distinction, as Duran does, between the two complementary rationales on which public action as a process is founded:

– an identification rationale, which makes it possible to determine the relevant actors, define the scope of their involvement and specify their degree of legitimacy; the challenge relates to the status of the actors in the sense that this determines their authority and thereby their legitimacy to act.

– a rationale for organising these actors for the purpose of producing effective action. The actors are also evaluated on what they do, in other words on their contribution to dealing with the problems identified as public problems which are therefore the responsibility of the public authorities. It is their power to act, in the sense of their capacity to act, that is at stake here rather than their authority [19]. This way of understanding governance and of giving the government an instrumental role in collective action has been at the heart of our approach for twenty years [20]. It clearly implies societal objectives that support a vision, shared by the actors, of a desirable future for all. We have often summarised these objectives as being the shared requirement for greater democracy and better development [21]. But, as Philippe Moreau Defarges rightly pointed out, the public interest no longer comes from the top down, but develops, flows and belongs to whoever exploits it [22]. Moreover, it is from this perspective that the rationale of empowerment is not only reserved for elected officials with responsibility for the issues under their mandate but extends to other stakeholders in distributed, shared, democratic governance [23], especially the Administration, businesses and civil society [24].

3. Supporting a Policy Lab for the Independent Regional Foresight Unit

Following the meeting with Minister-President Willy Borsus on 15 September 2017 and with the board of directors of the The Destree Institute on 5 December 2017, the Destree Institute revived its Foresight Unit under the name CiPré (Cellule indépendante de Prospective régionale – Independent Regional Foresight Unit) and backed the creation of a laboratory for collective, public and entrepreneurial policies for Wallonia in Europe: the Wallonia Policy Lab. This has been modelled on the EU Policy Lab, set up by the European Joint Research Centre and presented by Fabiana Scapolo, deputy head of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre, during the conference entitled Learning in the 21st century: citizenship, foresight and complexity, organised in the Economic and Social Council of Wallonia by The Destree Institute on 22 September 2017 as part of the Wallonia Young Foresight Research programme.

According to its own introduction, the European Policy Lab represents a collaborative and experimental space for developing innovative public or collective policies. Both a physical space and a way of working which combines foresight, behavioural insights [25], and the process of co-creation and innovation, in other words design thinking [26], the European Lab has set itself three tasks: firstly, to explore complexity and the long term in order to measure uncertainty; secondly, to bring together political objectives and collective actions and to improve decision-making and the reality of implementing decisions; and finally, to find solutions for developing better public or collective policies and to ensure that the strategies will apply in the real world [27]. We have embraced these tasks in Wallonia, in addition to our collaborations with the European Joint Research Centre, particularly on the project entitled The Future of Government 2030+, A Citizen Centric Perspective on New Government Models.

The proposal to create a Policy Lab seemed so important to the board of directors of The Destree Institute that it decided to accentuate its own name with this designation: The Destree Institute, Wallonia Policy Lab. This decision conveys three messages: the first is the operationalisation of foresight, which characterises the type of foresight that brings about change, as advocated by The Destree Institute. The University Certificate which it has jointly run with UMONS and the Open University in Charleroi since February 2017 is also called Operational Foresight [28]. The second message is the need for accelerated experimentation on a new, more involving democracy, based on governance by actors and innovative tools such as those developed globally in recent years around the concept of open government [29]. The third message concerns the uninhibited use of English and therefore the desire for internationalisation, even if the language chosen could have been that of one of our dynamic neighbours, Germany or the Netherlands, or of another country. Unrestrained access and openness to the world are absolute necessities for a region undergoing restructuring which, today, must more than ever position itself away from the faint-heartedness of yesterday.

In parallel, having run its course at the end of December 2017, the Wallonia Evaluation and Foresight Society, founded in 1999 on the initiative of The Destree Institute and several actors who were convinced of the need for these governance tools and advocated their use, decided to encourage this new initiative by sponsoring the Wallonia Policy Lab in terms of its intellectual and material heritage. This also means that, as it did at the end of the 1990s, The Destree Institute will once again, through this laboratory, pay close attention to the assessment and performance of public and collective policies which, naturally, represent one of the key axes of the policy process.

Conclusion: bringing order to future disorder

When we talk of Policy, we are referring to a course of action or a structured programme of actions guided by a vision of the future (principles, broad objectives, goals), which address some clearly identified challenges [30]. The process of governance, which has been in place since the early 2000s, has increased the need for a better grasp of policies by involving the stakeholders. Interdependence between the actors is an integral part of modern political action, changing it from public action into collective action.

It has been argued and repeatedly stated that, in the territories, and particularly in the regions, the doors to the future open downwards. Patrice Duran, referring to Michael Lipsky, the political scientist at Princeton [31], observed that changes usually resulted from the daily actions taken on the ground by public officials or peripheral actors rather than from the broad objectives set by the major decision centres. We, too, agree with the French professor that there is no point in developing ambitious objectives if they cannot usefully be translated into action content. In other words, it is not so much developing major programmes that counts but rather determining the process by which a decision may or may not emerge and take shape [32]. It’s certainly not going to happen overnight. Particular attention must be paid to the serious implementation of the objectives we set ourselves. Developing policies means – and this something we have forgotten rather too often in Wallonia in recent decades – carefully linking the key strategic directions to the concrete reality of the fieldwork and mobilising the diversity of actors operating on the ground [33]. That is how, using all our pragmatism, we can bring order to disorder, to use Philippe Zittoun’s well-turned phrase [34].

Moreover, two early initiatives have been taken in this regard. The first, as part of a joint initiative taken in November 2017, was to transform a hands-on training activity, Local powers and Social action, organised with the Wallonia Public Service DG05, into a genuine laboratory for those public officials to create their business practices of the future. The second initiative, at the beginning of February 2018, was to put together the « Investing in young people” citizens’ panel, which is being organised on the initiative of the Parliament of Wallonia by a Policy Lab that brings young people together to identify long-term challenges. In both cases, the participants needed to be quick, intellectually mobile, efficient, proactive, bright and operational. And that was the case. More on this in due course…

The Wallonia Policy Lab is very much in line with this moment in our history: a time when we are moving from grand ideological principles to experimentation – on the ground – with new, collective, concrete actions with a view to implementing them. This way of working will finally allow us to overcome our endemic shortcomings, our structural blockages and our mental and cultural inertia so that we can truly address the challenges we face. A time when, ultimately, we must stand together.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

[1] See, for example, the definition of Policy/Politique in the MEANS programme: ensemble d’activités différentes (programmes, procédures, lois, règlements) qui sont dirigées vers un même but, un même objectif général. Evaluer les programmes socio-économiques, Glossaire de 300 concepts et termes techniques, coll. MEANS, vol. 6., p. 33, European Commission, Community Structural Funds, 1999. – My thanks to my colleagues Pascale Van Doren and Michaël Van Cutsem for helping me develop and refine this document.

[2] Philippe ZITTOUN, La fabrique politique des politiques publiques, Une approche pragmatique de l’action publique, p. 10sv, Paris, Presses de Sciences Po, 2013. – Thierry BALZACQ e.a., Fondements de Science politique, p. 33, Louvain-la-Neuve, De Boeck, 2015. – See the broad discussion of the concept of policy in Michaël HILL & Frederic VARONE, The Public Policy Process, p. 16-23, New York & London, Routledge, 7th ed., 2017.

[3] A course or principle of action adopted or proposed by an organisation or individual. Oxford English Dictionary on line.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/policy (2 April 2018).

[4] Edward C. PAGE, The Origins of Policy, in Michael MORAN, Martin REIN & Robert E. GOODIN, Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, p. 210sv, Oxford University Press, 2006. – Brian W. HOGWOOD & Lewis A. GUNN, Policy Analysis for the Real World, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1984.

[5] See the blog of the London School of Economics and Political Science: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/

[6] Harold Dwight LASSWELL, A Pre-View of Policy Sciences, New York, American Elsevier, 1971.

[7] Aaron WILDAVSKY, Speaking Truth to Power, The Art and Craft of Policy Analysis, Boston, Little Brown, 1979.

[8] Joint Services Command and Staff College (JSCSC), now teaching at King’s College in London.

[9] William H. PARK, Policy, 4, in Jay M. SHAFRITZ Jr. ed., Defining Public Administration, Selections from the International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration, New York, Routledge, 2018.

[10] M. HILL & F. VARONE, The Public Policy Process…, p. 20. – Patrice DURAN, Penser l’action publique, p. 35, Paris, Lextenso, 2010.

[11] H. D. LASSWELL, A Pre-View of Policy Sciences…, p. 8.

[12] Oxford Handbook of Public Policy…, p. 6.

[13] Yehezkel DROR, Training for Policy Makers, in Handbook…, p. 82-86.

[14] Ibidem, p. 86sv.

[15] Edward C. PAGE, Policy without Politicians, Bureaucratic Influence in Comparative Perspective, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2012.

[16] Philippe DESTATTE, L’élaboration d’un nouveau contrat social, in Philippe DESTATTE dir., Mission prospective Wallonie 21, La Wallonie à l’écoute de la prospective, Premier Rapport au Ministre-Président du Gouvernement wallon, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 2003. 21 http://www.wallonie-en-ligne.net/Wallonie_Prospective/Mission-Prosp_W21/Rapport-2002/3-2_nouveau-contrat-social.htm – Steven A. ROSELL e.a., Governing in an Information Society, p. 21, Montréal, Institute for Research on Public Policy, 1992.

[17] Patrice DURAN, Penser l’action publique, p. 77, Paris, Lextenso, 2010.

[18] Thus, it demands that we consider all the actors and locations beyond the « core executive » involved in the policy making process. David RICHARDS & Martin J. SMITH, Governance and Public Policy in the UK, p. 2, Oxford University Press, 2002.

[19] P. DURAN, Penser l’action publique…, p. 76-77. Our translation.

[20] Ph. DESTATTE, Bonne gouvernance: contractualisation, évaluation et prospective, Trois atouts pour une excellence régionale, in Ph. DESTATTE dir., Evaluation, prospective et développement régional, p. 7sv, Charleroi, Institut-Destrée, 2001.

[21] Ph. DESTATTE, Plus de démocratie et un meilleur développement, Rapport général du quatrième Congrès La Wallonie au futur, dans La Wallonie au futur, Sortir du XXème siècle: évaluation, innovation, prospective, p. 436, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 1999.

[22] Philippe MOREAU DEFARGES, La gouvernance, p. 33, Paris, PuF, 2003.

[23] Gilles PAQUET, Gouvernance: mode d’emploi, Montréal, Liber, 2008.

[24] Policy analysts use the imperfect tools of their trade not only to assist legitimately elected officials in implementing their democratic mandates, but also to empower some groups rather than others. Oxford Handbook of Public Policy…, p. 28.

[25] Behavioural Insights is an inductive approach to policy making that combines insights from psychology, cognitive science, and social science with empirically-tested results to discover how humans actually make choices. Since 2013, OECD has been at the forefront of supporting public institutions who are applying behavioural insights to improving public policy. http://www.oecd.org/gov/regulatory-policy/behavioural-insights.htm

[26] See, for example, Paola COLETTI, Evidence for Public Policy Design, How to Learn from Best Practice, Palgrave Macmillan, New York – Houndmills Basingstoke UK, 2013.

[27] EU Policy Lab, a collaborative and experimental space for innovative policy-making, Brussels; European Commission, Joint Research Centre, 2017.

[28]  www.institut-destree.org/Certificat_Prospective_operationnelle

[29] Ph. DESTATTE, What is Open Government? Blog PhD2050, Reims, 7 November 2017,

https://phd2050.wordpress.com/2017/11/14/open-gov/

[30] Concerning identification of the challenges: Charles E. LINDBLOM, Policy-making Process, p. 12-14, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice-Hall, 1968.

[31] Michael LIPSKY, Street Level Bureaucracy, New York, Russel Sage, 1980.

[32] Patrice DURAN, Penser l’action publique, p. 48, Paris, Lextenso, 2010. Our translation.

[33] Jeffrey L. PRESSMAN & Aaron WILDAWSKY, Implementation, Berkeley CA, University of California Press, 1973. – Susan BARRETT & Colin FUDGE eds, Policy and Action, Essays on the Implementation of Public Policy, London, Methuen, 1981.

[34] Ph. ZITTOUN, op.cit., p. 326. Our translation.

Publicités

Namur, le 9 avril 2018

Il est des termes que l’on tente en vain de traduire sans parvenir à les clarifier de manière satisfaisante. C’est le cas des mots anglais policy ou policies. On peut bien sûr en approcher le sens lorsqu’on évoque une politique [1], voire les politiques publiques. Sauf que policy ne s’inscrit pas nécessairement dans un contexte politique [2], et n’appartient pas toujours au registre de la sphère publique. L’Oxford English Dictionary définit policy comme un parcours ou un principe d’action adopté ou proposé par une organisation ou un individu. [3] Les policies peuvent donc être organisationnelles, d’entreprises, individuelles ou collectives… et prendre des formes multiples, de l’intention à l’action, jusqu’au courant d’idées et leurs réalisations dans la législation, la mise en œuvre réglementaire et le changement quotidien [4]. Le monde académique anglo-saxon a adopté depuis longtemps la distinction entre politics et policies, précisant par ailleurs que ces dernières peuvent être public. Ainsi, la London School of Economics and Political Science distingue-t-elle entre British Politics and Policy, ou encore UK Government, Politics and Policy [5].

1. Intentions, décisions, objectifs et mise en œuvre

S’inspirant notamment des travaux des théoriciens du concept, en particulier des professeurs de l’Université de Yale Harold Dwight Lasswell (1902-1978) [6] et Aaron Wildavsky (1930-1993) [7], l’Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration (éd. 2015) définit Policy comme une décision ou, plus généralement, un ensemble de décisions interreliées relatives à un choix d’objectifs et les moyens de les réaliser. L’auteur de la notice, William H. Park, enseignant-chercheur à l’Académie militaire britannique [8], précise que ce processus comporte l’identification d’un problème appelant une solution ou un objectif qui mérite d’être atteint, l’évaluation des moyens alternatifs permettant les résultats désirés, le choix parmi ces alternatives, la mise en œuvre de l’option préférée, ainsi que la solution du problème ou la réalisation de l’objectif. Park observe qu’un tel processus devrait impliquer la participation d’un nombre restreint de décideurs, un degré élevé de consensus sur ce qui constitue un policy problem ou un objectif souhaitable, une capacité d’évaluer et de comparer les conséquences probables de chacune des alternatives, une mise en œuvre harmonieuse de l’option choisie, ainsi que l’absence d’obstacle à la réalisation des objectifs. Cela implique également que ce processus soit terminé par la réalisation et la mise en œuvre de la décision [9]. On le voit, quelle que soit la difficulté d’appréhender la notion, c’est surtout la rationalité du processus qui semble le caractériser [10]. Le fait aussi que, ainsi que le souligne Lasswell, les Policy approaches s’inscrivent dans leur contexte au lieu d’être fragmentées et que les perspectives sont axées sur les problèmes (problem-oriented) et non le contraire (problem-blind) [11]. Cette dernière considération nous renvoie à la systémique, que nous privilégions en prospective – même si elle est davantage que le contexte. Du reste, à en croire l’Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, les Policy studies partagent avec la prospective le fait d’être explicitement normatives et fondamentalement orientées vers l’action [12]. Normatives, elles le sont aussi en s’appuyant sur des valeurs qui déterminent leurs objectifs. Dans ce que Yehezkel Dror appelle les Grand Policies, le bien commun, l’intérêt général, la raison d’humanité (good of humanity as a whole) sont recherchés comme fléchage des stratégies. Comme l’indique l’ancien professeur de Sciences politiques à Harvard et à l’Université de Jérusalem, les Grand Policies tentent de réduire la probabilité de futurs néfastes, d’augmenter la probabilité de futurs favorables, tandis que leurs images et leurs évaluations changent avec le temps. Elles tentent aussi à se préparer à faire face à l’imprévu et l’imprévisible [13]. Sans que cela nous étonne, pour y parvenir, Dror préconise notamment de s’inscrire dans une pensée à la mesure de l’histoire (thinking-in-History) et de pratiquer le foresight, c’est-à-dire la prospective [14].

 2. Dans la gouvernance : identifier et articuler les acteurs

La gouvernance démocratique, c’est-à-dire le gouvernement par les acteurs, – y compris l’Administration [15] -, telle que notamment valorisée depuis le début des années 1990 par le Club de Rome et le Programme des Nations Unies pour le Développement [16], montre aussi, comme l’a relevé le sociologue Patrice Duran, que les institutions gouvernementales ont perdu le monopole de la conduite des affaires publiques [17]. Ce constat était également celui de David Richards et Martin J. Smith dans leur analyse des liens entre la gouvernance et la public policy au Royaume Uni. Pour ces deux politologues britanniques, la gouvernance exige que nous considérions tous les acteurs et tous les lieux de décisions au-delà du « noyau exécutif » impliqué dans le processus d’élaboration des politiques [18]. Si l’on prend bien en compte cette évolution, on peut distinguer, avec Duran, les deux logiques complémentaires qui fondent l’action publique en tant que processus :

– une logique d’identification qui permet de déterminer les acteurs pertinents, de situer la portée de leurs interventions et de préciser le degré de leur légitimité ; l’enjeu est celui du statut des acteurs au sens où celui-ci détermine leur autorité, et par là même leur légitimité à agir.

– une logique d’articulation de ces mêmes acteurs en vue de produire de l’action efficace. Les acteurs sont aussi évalués pour ce qu’ils font, c’est-à-dire pour leur contribution au traitement des problèmes identifiés comme publics, donc du ressort des autorités publiques. C’est moins leur autorité qui est en jeu ici que leur pouvoir, au sens de capacité à agir [19]. Cette manière d’appréhender la gouvernance et de rendre un rôle déterminant au gouvernement dans l’action collective est, depuis vingt ans, au cœur de notre approche [20]. Elle implique évidemment des finalités sociétales qui sous-tendent une vision commune aux acteurs d’un avenir souhaitable pour toutes et tous. Nous les avons souvent résumées par l’exigence partagée de plus de démocratie et d’un meilleur développement [21]. Mais comme l’indiquait justement Philippe Moreau Defarges, l’intérêt général n’est plus donné d’en haut mais se construit, circule et appartient à celui qui l’exploite [22]. C’est d’ailleurs dans cette perspective que la logique d’encapacitation (empowerment) n’y est pas seulement réservée aux élus en charge des affaires dans le cadre de leur mandat mais s’étend à d’autres parties-prenantes de la gouvernance démocratique, partagée, distribuée [23], en particulier l’Administration, les entreprises ainsi que la société civile [24].

3. Adosser un Policy Lab à la Cellule indépendante de Prospective régionale

Faisant suite à la rencontre avec le Ministre-Président Willy Borsus le 15 septembre 2017 ainsi qu’au Conseil d’administration de l’Institut Destrée du 5 décembre 2017, l’Institut Destrée a réactivé son Pôle Prospective sous l’appellation de CiPré (Cellule indépendante de Prospective régionale) et y a adossé un laboratoire des politiques collectives, publiques et entrepreneuriales (policies) de la Wallonie en Europe : le Wallonia Policy Lab. Celui-ci a été créé sur le modèle de l’EU Policy Lab, mis en place par l’European Joint Research Center et qui a été présenté par Fabiana Scapolo, cheffe adjointe du Centre commun de Recherche de la Commission européenne au Conseil économique et social de Wallonie lors du colloque Apprendre au XXIème siècle : citoyenneté, prospective et complexité, y organisé par l’Institut Destrée le 22 septembre 2017 dans le cadre du programme Wallonia Young Foresight Research.

L’European Policy Lab constitue, ainsi qu’il se présente lui-même, un espace collaboratif et expérimental destiné à fabriquer des politiques publiques ou collectives innovantes. A la fois espace physique et manière de travailler qui combine la prospective (Foresight), l’analyse des comportements (Behavioural Insights) [25], et le processus de co-créativité et d’innovation (Design Thinking) [26], le Lab européen s’est donné trois tâches : d’abord, explorer la complexité et le long terme afin de prendre la mesure de l’incertitude ; ensuite, faire se rencontrer les objectifs politiques et les actions collectives ainsi qu’améliorer les prises de décisions et la réalité de leur mise en œuvre ; enfin, trouver des solutions pour construire de meilleures politiques publiques ou collectives et s’assurer que les stratégies vont s’appliquer dans le monde réel [27]. Ces tâches, nous les avons faites nôtres en Wallonie, au-delà des collaborations que nous entretenons avec le Joint Research Centre européen, en particulier sur le projet The Future of Government 2030+, A Citizen Centric Perspective on New Governement Models.

La proposition de créer un Policy Lab est apparue tellement importante au Conseil d’administration de l’Institut Destrée, qu’il a décidé de souligner son propre nom par cette dénomination : Institut Destrée, The Wallonia Policy Lab. Ce choix est porteur de trois messages : le premier, c’est l’opérationnalisation de la prospective, ce qui caractérise le type de prospective porteuse de changement que promeut l’Institut Destrée. Le Certificat d’université qu’il co-organise depuis février 2017 avec l’UMONS et l’Université ouverte à Charleroi s’appelle d’ailleurs Prospective opérationnelle [28]. Le deuxième message est la nécessité d’une expérimentation accélérée d’une nouvelle démocratie plus impliquante, fondée sur une gouvernance d’acteurs ainsi que des outils innovants comme ceux développés au niveau mondial ces dernières années autour du concept de gouvernement ouvert [29]. Le troisième message porte sur l’usage décomplexé de l’anglais et donc sur la volonté d’internationalisation, même si la langue choisie aurait pu être celle d’un de nos dynamiques voisins : l’Allemagne ou les Pays-Bas, voire d’autres. L’accès et l’ouverture décomplexés au monde constituent des nécessités absolues pour une région en redéploiement qui, aujourd’hui, doit plus que jamais se positionner loin des frilosités d’hier.

Parallèlement, arrivée au bout de sa course fin de décembre 2017, la Société wallonne de l’Évaluation et de la Prospective, fondée à l’initiative de l’Institut Destrée et de plusieurs acteurs promoteurs et convaincus de la nécessité de ces outils de gouvernance en 1999, a décidé d’encourager cette nouvelle initiative en patronnant le Wallonia Policy Lab de ses héritages intellectuels et matériels. Cela signifie également que, comme il le faisait à la fin des années 1990, l’Institut Destrée va, au travers de ce laboratoire, prêter à nouveau une grande attention à l’évaluation et à la performance des politiques publiques et collectives qui constitue, bien entendu, un des axes forts du Policy Process.

Conclusion : mettre de l’ordre dans le désordre du futur

Lorsqu’on parle de Policy, on vise une ligne de conduite ou un programme structuré d’actions guidés par une vision de l’avenir (principes, grands objectifs, finalités), qui répond à des enjeux clairement identifiés [30]. Le processus de gouvernance, en vigueur depuis le début des années 2000, a accru la nécessité de mieux appréhender les politiques en y impliquant les parties prenantes. L’interdépendance entre les acteurs est constitutive de l’action politique moderne qui fait passer cette dernière de l’action publique à l’action collective.

Il a été soutenu et répété que, dans les territoires, et en particulier les régions, les portes de l’avenir s’ouvrent par le bas. Patrice Duran, faisant référence au politologue de Princeton Michael Lipsky [31] observait que les changements résultaient plus souvent des gestes quotidiens posés sur le terrain par les fonctionnaires ou les acteurs de la périphérie que des grands objectifs fixés par les grands centres de décision. Nous pensons, nous aussi, avec le professeur français, qu’il ne sert à rien en effet de développer des objectifs ambitieux si on ne peut valablement les traduire en contenu d’action. Autrement dit, c’est moins la formulation des grands programmes qui compte que la détermination des processus à travers lesquels une décision verra ou non le jour et prendra corps [32]. Certes, cela ne s’improvise pas. Un soin particulier doit être consacré à la mise en œuvre sérieuse des objectifs que l’on s’assigne. Construire des policies, c’est – nous l’avons un peu trop oublié en Wallonie ces dernières décennies – articuler avec soin les grandes orientations stratégiques avec la réalité concrète du travail de terrain et y mobiliser la diversité des acteurs qui y règnent [33]. C’est là qu’il s’agit de mettre, en usant de tout son pragmatisme, de l’ordre dans le désordre, pour reprendre la belle formule de Philippe Zittoun [34].

Deux premières initiatives ont d’ailleurs été prises en ce sens. La première fut de transformer, dans une initiative conjointe prise en novembre 2017, une formation-action à la prospective organisée avec la DGO5 du Service public de Wallonie Pouvoirs locaux et Action sociale, en véritable laboratoire de construction par ces fonctionnaires de leurs métiers de demain. La seconde initiative fut, début février 2018, de préparer le panel citoyen « Investir dans les jeunes » organisé à l’initiative du Parlement de Wallonie, par un Policy Lab réunissant des jeunes, afin d’identifier des enjeux de long terme. Dans les deux cas, il s’agissait pour les participants d’être rapides, intellectuellement mobiles, efficaces, proactifs, vifs, opérationnels. Et ce fut le cas. Nous y reviendrons…

Le Wallonia Policy Lab correspond bien à ce moment de notre histoire : celui où l’on passe des grands principes idéologiques à celui de l’expérimentation – au sol – de nouvelles actions collectives et concrètes, en vue de leur mise en application. Cette manière de travailler nous permettra de surmonter, enfin, nos travers endémiques, nos blocages structurels ainsi que nos inerties mentales et culturelles, afin de répondre véritablement aux enjeux qui sont les nôtres. Ce moment où, enfin, on doit se redresser.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

 

[1] Voir par exemple la définition de Policy / Politique dans le programme MEANS : ensemble d’activités différentes (programmes, procédures, lois, règlements) qui sont dirigées vers un même but, un même objectif général. Evaluer les programmes socio-économiques, Glossaire de 300 concepts et termes techniques, coll. MEANS, vol. 6., p. 33, Commission européenne, Fonds structurels communautaires, 1999. – Mes remerciements à mes collègues Pascale Van Doren et Michaël Van Cutsem de m’avoir aidé à nourrir et affiner ce texte.

[2] Philippe ZITTOUN, La fabrique politique des politiques publiques, Une approche pragmatique de l’action publique, p. 10sv, Paris, Presses de Sciences Po, 2013. – Thierry BALZACQ e.a., Fondements de Science politique, p. 33, Louvain-la-Neuve, De Boeck, 2015. – Voir la large mise en discussion du concept de policy dans Michaël HILL & Frederic VARONE, The Public Policy Process, p. 16-23, New York & London, Routledge, 7e ed., 2017.

[3] A course or principle of action adopted or proposed by an organisation or individual. Oxford English Dictionary on line.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/policy (2 avril 2018).

[4] Edward C. PAGE, The Origins of Policy, in Michael MORAN, Martin REIN & Robert E. GOODIN, Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, p. 210sv, Oxford University Press, 2006. – Brian W. HOGWOOD & Lewis A. GUNN, Policy Analysis for the Real World, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1984.

[5] Voir le blog de la London School of Economics and Political Science : http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/

[6] Harold Dwight LASSWELL, A Pre-View of Policy Sciences, New York, American Elsevier, 1971.

[7] Aaron WILDAVSKY, Speaking Truth to Power, The Art and Craft of Policy Analysis, Boston, Little Brown, 1979.

[8] Joint Services Command and Staff College (JSCSC), maintenant enseignant au King’s Collège à Londres.

[9] William H. PARK, Policy, 4, in Jay M. SHAFRITZ Jr. ed., Defining Public Administration, Selections from the International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration, New York, Routledge, 2018.

[10] M. HILL & F. VARONE, The Public Policy Process…, p. 20. – Patrice DURAN, Penser l’action publique, p. 35, Paris, Lextenso, 2010.

[11] We note that policy approaches tend toward contextuality in place of fragmentation and toward problem-oriented not problem-blind perspectives. H. D. LASSWELL, A Pre-View of Policy Sciences…, p. 8.

[12] Oxford Handbook of Public Policy…, p. 6.

[13] Yehezkel DROR, Training for Policy Makers, in Handbook…, p. 82-86.

[14] Ibidem, p. 86sv.

[15] Edward C. PAGE, Policy without Policians, Bureaucratic Influence in Comparative Perspective, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2012.

[16] Philippe DESTATTE, L’élaboration d’un nouveau contrat social, dans Philippe DESTATTE dir., Mission prospective Wallonie 21, La Wallonie à l’écoute de la prospective, Premier Rapport au Ministre-Président du Gouvernement wallon, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 2003. 21 http://www.wallonie-en-ligne.net/Wallonie_Prospective/Mission-Prosp_W21/Rapport-2002/3-2_nouveau-contrat-social.htm – Steven A. ROSELL e.a., Governing in an Information Society, p. 21, Montréal, Institute for Research on Public Policy, 1992.

[17] Patrice DURAN, Penser l’action publique, p. 77, Paris, Lextenso, 2010.

[18] Thus, it demands that we consider all the actors and locations beyond the « core executive » involved in the policy making process. David RICHARDS & Martin J. SMITH, Governance and Public Policy in the UK, p. 2, Oxford University Press, 2002.

[19] P. DURAN, Penser l’action publique…, p. 76-77.

[20] Ph. DESTATTE, Bonne gouvernance : contractualisation, évaluation et prospective, Trois atouts pour une excellence régionale, dans Ph. DESTATTE dir., Evaluation, prospective et développement régional, p. 7sv, Charleroi, Institut-Destrée, 2001.

[21] Ph. DESTATTE, Plus de démocratie et un meilleur développement, Rapport général du quatrième Congrès La Wallonie au futur, dans La Wallonie au futur, Sortir du XXème siècle : évaluation, innovation, prospective, p. 436, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 1999.

[22] Philippe MOREAU DEFARGES, La gouvernance, p. 33, Paris, PuF, 2003.

[23] Gilles PAQUET, Gouvernance : mode d’emploi, Montréal, Liber, 2008.

[24] Policy analysts use the imperfect tools of their trade not only to assist legitimately elected officials in implementing their democratic mandates, but also to empower some groups rather than others. Oxford Handbook of Public Policy…, p. 28.

[25] Behavioural Insights is an inductive approach to policy making that combines insights from psychology, cognitive science, and social science with empirically-tested results to discover how humans actually make choices. Since 2013, OECD has been at the forefront of supporting public institutions who are applying behavioural insights to improving public policy. http://www.oecd.org/gov/regulatory-policy/behavioural-insights.htm

[26] Voir par exemple Paola COLETTI, Evidence for Public Policy Design, How to Learn from Best Practice, Palgrave Macmillan, New York – Houndmills Basingstoke UK, 2013.

[27] EU Policy Lab, a collaborative and experimental space for innovative policy-making, Brussels; European Commission, Joint Research Centre, 2017.

[28]  www.institut-destree.org/Certificat_Prospective_operationnelle

[29] Philippe DESTATTE, Qu’est-ce qu’un gouvernement ouvert ?, Blog PhD2050, Reims, 7 novembre 2017,

https://phd2050.wordpress.com/2017/11/09/opengov-fr/

[30] Sur l’identification des enjeux : Charles E. LINDBLOM, Policy-making Process, p. 12-14, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice-Hall, 1968.

[31] Michael LIPSKY, Street Level Bureaucracy, New York, Russel Sage, 1980.

[32] Patrice DURAN, Penser l’action publique, p. 48, Paris, Lextenso, 2010.

[33] Jeffrey L. PRESSMAN & Aaron WILDAWSKY, Implementation, Berkeley CA, University of California Press, 1973. – Susan BARRETT & Colin FUDGE eds, Policy and Action, Essays on the Implementation of Public Policy, London, Methuen, 1981.

[34] Ph. ZITTOUN, op.cit., p. 326.

Namur, le 22 mars 2018

A la rentrée de l’année académique 1968-1969, alors qu’au lendemain de la vague de contestation de la modernité, le monde hésitait sur les orientations à prendre en toutes matières, l’éditorialiste de Perspective, le périodique de l’Union générale des Étudiants de Liège écrivait en épousant le point de vue de la Wallonie : nous avons besoin d’un nouvel État plus entreprenant, de partis rénovés, mais les hommes (et les idées) sont plus vieux ici que partout ailleurs. Mais pourquoi les jeunes seraient-ils ici plus résignés qu’ailleurs alors que leur avenir est plus sombre que partout [1] ? La crainte était – et est restée grande en effet – de voir se réaliser la prophétie du professeur Alfred Sauvy de voir la Wallonie devenir une région de vieilles gens, vivant dans de vieilles maisons et ressassant de vieilles idées [2]

Qu’est devenue la jeunesse wallonne ?

Cinquante ans plus tard, qu’est devenue la jeunesse wallonne ? Non pas celle d’il y a cinquante ans. De celle-là, nous nous sommes préoccupés lors des travaux prospectifs sur la gestion du vieillissement, au Parlement de Wallonie en 2017. Un point d’étape de cette réflexion a d’ailleurs eu lieu avec le nouveau gouvernement wallon, le 26 janvier 2018, où le panel citoyen consacré à ce sujet a eu un dialogue constructif avec le Ministre-Président Willy Borsus et sa Vice-présidente Alda Gréoli. Ce sur quoi nous nous interrogeons désormais, c’est sur la jeunesse d’aujourd’hui. Pour la côtoyer quotidiennement dans les auditoires, les salles de séminaires ou dans les bureaux d’entreprises innovantes, nous aimerions la décrire motivée, enthousiaste et très souvent compétente. Mais nous savons que la réalité est multiple et que, notamment, la situation des jeunes Wallonnes et des jeunes Wallons face au marché de l’emploi est extrêmement difficile. Et puis, il en existe aussi de nombreux qui cherchent encore une voie, voire qui ont renoncé à en trouver.

Pourtant, c’est la Commissaire européenne pour l’Emploi, les Affaires sociales, les Compétences et la Mobilité des travailleurs, la très dynamique Marianne Thyssen, qui disait en 2016 que l’avenir de l’Europe est entre les mains de nos jeunes. Ils sont notre atout le plus précieux. Nous ne pouvons pas nous permettre de délaisser la partie la plus brillante et la plus ingénieuse de notre société alors que nombre de régions sont encore confrontées à des taux de chômage inacceptables parmi les jeunes [3]. Lancée en 2013 par la Commission européenne, l’Initiative pour l’Emploi des Jeunes (IEJ) vise à réduire le niveau de chômage parmi ceux-ci dans les régions les plus touchées de l’Union européenne. L’IEJ alloue 6,4 milliards EUR de fonds aux régions pour la période 2014-2020 en vue de soutenir des actions qui aident les jeunes à accéder au marché du travail . En Wallonie, les provinces de Liège et du Hainaut ont bénéficié de ce programme au titre de régions où le chômage des jeunes excédait 25% en 2012 [4]. Nous ne savons pas si nous devons d’abord nous en réjouir ou nous en lamenter. Dans tous les cas, il nous faut agir pour y répondre.

Selon le FOREM, qui se base sur les données Eurostat, le taux de chômage des jeunes de moins de 25 ans était en Wallonie de 27,9% en 2016, soit 7,8 % au-dessus de la moyenne belge et 9,8 % au-dessus de la moyenne européenne (EU28) [5]. Cette réalité représente une moyenne de 45.407 demandeurs d’emploi inoccupés (DEI) de moins de 25 ans. 43% d’entre eux sont faiblement qualifiés, c’est-à-dire qu’ils ont un diplôme du 2e degré du secondaire. 17% d’entre eux sont inoccupés depuis 2 ans et plus [6].

Dans un contexte où une reprise économique est annoncée depuis 2013, il est clair que cette évolution est impactée par les modifications législatives et réglementaires qui ont été prises au fédéral – en particulier l’exclusion au bout de trois ans des chômeurs en allocation d’attente [7] -, ou celles qui n’ont pas été prises à la Région wallonne avant juillet 2017. Ce n’est en effet que début 2017 que le Pacte pour l’emploi et les nouveaux décrets orientés vers les jeunes ont été finalisés. Depuis le 1er juillet 2017, le paysage des aides à l’emploi a été modifié et les jeunes de moins de 25 ans y sont identifiés comme prioritaires.

Quatre jeunes sur dix sont éloignés de l’emploi

Une enquête réalisée auprès des conseillers-référents du FOREM montre que quatre jeunes sur dix peuvent être qualifiés « d’éloignés de l’emploi » tandis qu’un quart des jeunes semblent « très proches » de l’emploi. Les freins à l’emploi qui apparaissent les plus prégnants sont : le manque d’expérience professionnelle, les lacunes en méthode de recherche d’emploi, le niveau d’études insuffisant ainsi que les problèmes de mobilité [8]. Certains jeunes pourraient constituer une catégorie à part, leur situation matérielle et familiale étant très difficile et/ou ils sont affectés par des problèmes judiciaires, de logement, de disponibilité, de mobilité ou encore d’aptitudes ou de compétences intellectuelles, mentales, sociales, etc. [9]

Les jeunes qui ne sont pas dans un emploi ou ne suivent pas de formation sont connus sous l’appellation de NEETs (Youth neither in employment nor education and training) : il s’agit d’un indicateur qui s’exprime en pourcentage de la population de 15 à 24 ans.

L’agence publique européenne Eurofound [10], répercuté par l’AMEF (Veille, analyse et prospective du marché de l’emploi, au FOREM), en identifie cinq principales catégories :

– les chômeurs au sens conventionnel, c’est la part la plus large ;

– les personnes non disponibles sur le marché de l’emploi en raison d’une maladie, d’un handicap, ou de la prise en charge d’un proche ;

– les personnes désengagées, c’est-à-dire ne cherchant pas d’emploi ou à étudier, et n’y étant pas contraintes (en ce compris les jeunes « découragés » par le travail et les jeunes engagés dans des modes de vie marginaux) ;

– les chercheurs d’opportunités, c’est-à-dire des personnes qui bien que cherchant activement un emploi (ou une formation), se réservent pour une opportunité qu’elles jugent digne de leur compétence ou de leur statut ;

– les NEETs « volontaires », qu’ils voyagent ou soient engagés de manière constructive dans d’autres activités telles que l’art ou l’auto-apprentissage [11].

Même si certains observateurs ou acteurs voient dans la catégorisation des NEETs une forme de violence symbolique, cet indicateur contribue à approcher, au moins chez les jeunes, le phénomène dit de sherwoodisation, tellement difficile à appréhender statistiquement. Ce concept est dû à la collaboration entre quelques chercheurs européens, et a été popularisé en Wallonie par Bernard Van Asbrouck, chercheur universitaire et conseiller au FOREM. La sherwoodisation désigne le processus selon lequel des populations entières, en voie de défection sociale, échappent aux différents mécanismes de cohésion et disparaissent des statistiques d’obligation scolaire, de chômage, d’aide sociale et même d’état civil, pour rejoindre une forêt de Sherwood virtuelle, en référence à l’histoire de Robin des Bois et du shérif de Nottingham. Ces fugueurs de la statistique y poursuivent une vie en marge de la société, et répondent à des règles internes qui échappent à celles de la démocratie représentative classique. Alors que les données approximatives et très parcellaires du début des années 2010 estimaient ces populations à environ 5 à 7 % des habitants des quartiers identifiés, ce pourcentage se serait élevé à plus de 20 % fin de la décennie. L’origine de cet accroissement provenait bien sûr de l’accentuation des crises financière, économique, sociale, environnementale, mais aussi surtout de la crise morale, éthique qui a frappé les régions européennes, les privant du sens qui fonde les sociétés et qui leur permet d’intégrer leur propre population, sinon les populations étrangères qu’elles devraient pouvoir accueillir. L’économiste britannique Guy Standing a également approché ce phénomène au travers du concept de précariat, qui en est assurément un symptôme [12]. Les différents chiffres cités révèlent une réalité quotidienne extrêmement difficile pour nombre de citoyennes et de citoyens, mais aussi d’étrangers présents sur le territoire, en particulier les jeunes. L’absence d’emploi contribue à la déréliction sociale et au délitement d’une jeunesse fragilisée.

 

Une jeunesse créative qui a soif d’entreprendre

Beaucoup reste à faire dans le seul domaine de l’activité et de l’emploi. La nouvelle Déclaration de Politique régionale de juillet 2017 précise d’ailleurs que :

La principale ressource économique de la Wallonie réside dans sa jeunesse et son formidable terreau socio-économique. Cette capacité d’entreprendre et de choisir son destin doit être remise au centre de l’action publique wallonne. Les pouvoirs publics doivent établir un cadre d’action qui soit le plus propice à l’émergence ou à la montée en puissance des initiatives des Wallons.

Nous avons en Wallonie une jeunesse créative qui a soif d’entreprendre. La volonté du Gouvernement est de développer un environnement favorable à l’entrepreneuriat en insufflant la confiance en soi et en l’avenir.

Ces jeunes entrepreneurs seront valorisés en facilitant l’éclosion d’idées nouvelles et la création d’entreprises. Pour ce faire, le Gouvernement souhaite systématiser dans les hautes écoles et universités les structures d’accompagnement des étudiants-entrepreneurs en leur donnant la possibilité d’avoir les conseils d’experts en différents domaines (finances, comptabilité, gestion, etc.), en complémentarité avec le statut d’étudiant-entrepreneur développé au niveau fédéral [13].

Le 30 janvier 2018, donnant une conférence au Cercle de Wallonie au Château de Colonster, le Ministre-Président Willy Borsus faisait de la dynamisation de l’emploi son premier enjeu, en insistant à la fois sur la nécessité d’une formation initiale solide et d’une formation continuée de qualité, mais aussi sur une adéquation réelle aux besoins sociétaux. Prévenant les critiques de ceux qui ne plaident que pour l’émancipation personnelle, le nouveau Ministre-Président ajoutait que : il ne faut pas réguler la formation en fonction du marché de l’emploi, ce qui serait intellectuellement insoutenable, mais il faut fondamentalement les rapprocher. Cette analyse est largement confirmée par une étude de l’AMEF dans laquelle les experts du FOREM observent un marché wallon de l’emploi contrarié par des tensions liées à l’inadéquation entre les compétences maîtrisées par les demandeurs d’emploi et celles recherchées par les entreprises [14]. Cette étude met d’ailleurs à nouveau en évidence la bonne performance, mesurée par le taux d’insertion [15], des contrats d’apprentissage et de l’enseignement en alternance des réseaux CEFA et IFAPME, même si on sait que ceux-ci ne mobilisent pas actuellement suffisamment de jeunes pour créer une véritable dynamique de remédiation à la fragilité de l’emploi productif. Beaucoup d’observateurs pensent néanmoins que, au-delà des freins institutionnels encore puissants – je pense notamment au cloisonnement entre la Communauté française et la Région wallonne -, c’est dans ces formules pragmatiques et hybrides que réside une bonne partie des conditions de notre redéploiement collectif et, en particulier, de celui de nos jeunes.

Qu’on leur fasse confiance et qu’on leur rende espoir sont deux des attentes légitimes que les jeunes ont envers notre société. Qu’on y parvienne et on changera la donne dans cette Wallonie qui, nous en sommes persuadés, peut désormais entreprendre de grands défis.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

 

 

[1] DELTA, La Wallonie sur la voie du sous-développement, dans Perspective, n° 1, Nouvelle Série, octobre 1968, p. 2.

[2] Le Rapport Sauvy, sur le problème de l’économie et de la population en Wallonie, Liège, Conseil économique wallon, 1962.

[3] Initiative pour l’emploi des jeunes, Investir dans les jeunes, Bruxelles, Commission européenne, 2016.

http://ec.europa.eu/social/main.jsp?catId=738&langId=fr&pubId=7940&furtherPubs=yes

[4] Initiative pour l’emploi des jeunes, Investir dans les jeunes, Bruxelles, Commission européenne, 2016.

http://ec.europa.eu/social/main.jsp?catId=738&langId=fr&pubId=7940&furtherPubs=yes

[5] AMEF (Veille, analyse et prospective du marché de l’emploi), Les jeunes wallons et le marché de l’emploi, 27 Juillet 2017, p. 1. https://www.leforem.be/MungoBlobs/566/282/20170727_Analyses_Les_jeunes_Wallons_et_le_marche_de_l%27emploi.pdfSituation du marché de l’emploi wallon, Statistiques mensuelles, Le Forem, Février 2018, p. 20.

https://www.leforem.be/MungoBlobs/268/292/20180312_Chiffres_SeriesStatistiquesMde201802.pdf

[6] Les jeunes wallons et le marché de l’emploi…, p. 2.

[7] Dominique LIESSE, Les mesures Di Rupo font 29.000 exclus du chômage, dans L’Echo, 21 juin 2016.

[8] AMEF (Veille, analyse et prospective du marché de l’emploi), Les jeunes wallons et le marché de l’emploi, Juillet 2017, p. 7. https://www.leforem.be/MungoBlobs/566/282/20170727_Analyses_Les_jeunes_Wallons_et_le_marche_de_l%27emploi.pdf

[9] Ibidem.

[10] Fondation européenne pour l’amélioration des conditions de vie et de travail. EUROSTAT, Statistics Explained, Youth neither in Employment nor Education or Training (NEET), July 2017.

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Statistics_on_young_people_neither_in_employment_nor_in_education_or_training

[11] Ibidem, p. 8.

[12] Guy STANDING, The Precariat, The New Dangerous Class, p. 24-25, London, Bloomsbury Academic, 2011.

[13] La Wallonie plus forte, Déclaration de Politique régionale, Namur, 25 juillet 2017, p. 8.

[14] AMEF, L’insertion au travail des jeunes demandeurs d’emploi wallons sortis de l’enseignement en 2016, Forem, Août 2017. https://www.leforem.be/MungoBlobs/892/583/20170901_Analyses_Insertion-JeunesDE-SortisEnseignement2016_VF.pdf

[15] Le taux d’insertion est le rapport entre le nombre de jeunes insérés au moins un jour à l’emploi et le nombre total de jeunes inscrits. Il faut avoir à l’esprit que le taux d’insertion des jeunes en contrat d’apprentissage reste supérieur de 6 points (65%) à celui des masters (59%), le bac ayant un niveau de 77%.

Namur, Parlement de Wallonie, le 3 mars 2018

Le 20 janvier 2018, lors de l’émission RTBF radio Le Grand Oral, Béatrice Delvaux et Jean-Pierre Jacquemin interrogeaient le directeur de la Fondation pour les Générations futures, Benoît Derenne, concernant la conférence-consensus portant sur certaines questions du Pacte d’excellence de la Communauté française. Évoquant les exercices délibératifs citoyens comme celui qu’entame le Parlement de Wallonie le 3 mars 2018 [1], les deux journalistes parlaient d’une forme de récupération, de naïveté, ou même d’un alibi du politique.

Ma conviction est radicalement différente. Je pense, tout au contraire de ces commentateurs, que la redéfinition d’une relation fondamentale de confiance entre les élus, organisés en assemblée, et les citoyens invités à y siéger en parallèle, est non seulement nécessaire, mais aussi qu’elle est salutaire et qu’elle demande des efforts considérables.

La redéfinition d’une relation fondamentale de confiance entre les élus et les citoyens

Elle est nécessaire, car cette confiance est rompue. Elle s’est délitée progressivement avec l’ensemble des institutions au fur et à mesure que le citoyen s’éduquait, se formait, comprenait mieux l’environnement politique, économique et social dans lequel il évolue. La démocratisation des études, la radio et la télévision, l’internet, les réseaux sociaux, sont autant de vecteurs qui, dans les cinquante dernières années ont progressivement encapacité de plus en plus de citoyens, leur ont permis de mieux comprendre le monde, ses acteurs et ses facteurs, et par là, d’exiger des institutions une ouverture, un dialogue, une éthique de nature nouvelle. Depuis les années 1970, toutes les institutions ont été mises en cause profondément, parfois violemment, parce qu’elles n’avaient pas pu évoluer : l’école, la gendarmerie, la justice, les médias, l’administration, les institutions politiques, de la monarchie à la commune, en passant par tous les gouvernements et tous les parlements. L’Europe et le monde n’ont d’ailleurs pas échappé à cette évolution et tentent d’ailleurs de réagir fortement par des initiatives nouvelles comme l’European Policy Lab, les travaux sur l’avenir du Gouvernement (The Future of Government) ou le Partenariat pour une Gouvernement ouvert qui regroupe désormais plus de 70 pays [2]. Dès lors, je pense que la rupture de cette confiance représente à terme un danger de mort pour notre démocratie, car les citoyens cessent d’y investir. Et, comme le craignait Raymond Aron : lorsque manquent la discipline et la sagesse des citoyens, les démocraties sauvent peut-être la douceur de vivre, mais elles cessent de garantir le destin de la patrie [3].

Elle est salutaire, car cette confiance peut être renouée. Dans leur très grande majorité, les citoyennes et les citoyens ne sont pas des anarchistes. Ils ne veulent pas vivre sans État, sans institutions, sans règles. Ce sont des pragmatiques qui recherchent du sens dans le monde et ses composantes pour pouvoir s’y inscrire pleinement en articulant des aspirations collectives, sociétales, et des désirs personnels, des besoins familiaux. Depuis les années 1980, les institutions et les politiques ont tenté de répondre à leur mise en cause. À chaque « affaire » qui s’est déclenchée, à chaque mise en cause fondamentale, a répondu un effort d’objectivation, de compréhension et de remédiation. Et les Parlements ont été en première ligne, avec d’abord les commissions d’enquête (Heysel, Jos Wyninckx, Brabant wallon, Cools, Dutroux, Publifin, etc.), des recommandations et leur mise en œuvre législatives (loi Luc D’Hoore sur le financement des partis politiques, etc.) ou exécutives (suppression de la gendarmerie, procédures Franchimont, etc.) [4].

Le rétablissement de cette confiance demande des efforts considérables de recherche, d’expérimentation, de stabilisation. Je peux témoigner de cette préoccupation pour les institutions wallonnes pour avoir eu l’occasion de m’en soucier dans la durée, déjà avec Guy Spitaels, lorsqu’il présidait le Parlement de Wallonie de 1995 à 1997, ensuite avec Robert Collignon (2000-2004), Emily Hoyos (2009-2012), Patrick Dupriez (2012-2014) et aujourd’hui avec André Antoine et le Bureau du Parlement, pour qui nous avons suivi les travaux de la Commission de rénovation démocratique en 2014 et 2015, avant de réaliser, avec le politologue Christian de Visscher, le rapport qui a servi de base au colloque du 17 novembre 2015 sur Les ressorts d’une démocratie wallonne renouvelée, dans le cadre du 35e anniversaire des lois d’août 1980 et du 20e anniversaire de l’élection directe et séparée des parlementaires wallons [5]. Pour ce qui nous concerne, le passage à l’acte de ces réflexions a été l’organisation du panel citoyen sur les enjeux de la gestion du vieillissement, suivant une méthodologie que nous avions déjà inaugurée en Wallonie en 1994 avec Pascale Van Doren et Marie-Anne Delahaut, et l’appui des professeurs Michel Quévit et Gilbert de Landsheere [6].

Ainsi, la question elle-même de la participation des citoyens n’est-elle pas neuve au Parlement de Wallonie. Lors de sa séance du 16 juin 1976 déjà, le Conseil régional wallon adopta une résolution en référence à une proposition du sénateur Jacques Cerf, un élu Rassemblement wallon de Lehal-Trahegnies, dans la circonscription de Charleroi-Thuin, qui fut vice-président de l’Assemblée, – le Conseil régional était alors uniquement composé de sénateurs – portant sur la création de commissions permanentes de participation dans les communes et l’obligation d’informer les citoyens sur la gestion communale [7].

S’il n’est pas nouveau ni limité au niveau régional, cet enjeu de relations avec les citoyennes et citoyens n’est pas non plus propre à la Wallonie ni à la Belgique. L’absence de consultation des citoyens entre les élections est une des critiques majeures adressées aux institutions avec l’insuffisance du contrôle parlementaire sur les décisions politiques monopolisées par le pouvoir exécutif, pour citer Luc Rouban, directeur de recherche au CNRS, évoquant la situation française et s’interrogeant pour savoir si la démocratie représentative est en crise [8].

Et c’est ici que nous répondons à tous les sceptiques, parmi les journalistes, chroniqueurs ou même les élues et les élus qui n’ont pas toujours pris conscience de la nécessité d’une refondation démocratique, qui puisse à la fois répondre à un besoin de démocratie approfondie, et infléchir ou même renouveler les politiques collectives entre les échéances électorales. Il s’agit bien là d’instaurer une démocratie permanente, continue, horizontale, ou même une démocratie intelligente, pour reprendre la belle formule de mon regretté ami l’Ambassadeur Kimon Valaskakis, ancien président du Club d’Athènes, qui était venu, en 2010, faire une belle conférence pour le Parlement de Wallonie. Une démocratie, qui, comme le dit également Luc Rouban, ressemble davantage au profil citoyen, qui soit moins oligarchique, c’est-à-dire qui échappe à l’accaparement du pouvoir politique par une minorité qui défende ou cherche à satisfaire des intérêts privatifs (prend des distances avec la professionnalisation de la vie politique, échappe aux conflits d’intérêts, à la corruption, à la soumission aux groupes de pression, à l’influence parfois étouffante des Cabinets ministériels, etc.) [9]. Une démocratie également qui s’inscrive dans l’imputabilité, le rendre compte au contribuable, qui désacralise le politique – le pouvoir politique a désormais perdu toute transcendance, rappelait le sociologue Patrice Duran [10] -, tout en respectant l’élu pour son implication et la qualité de son travail au service de la collectivité, du bien commun, de l’intérêt général.

Si nous voulons résoudre les problèmes, il nous faut les maîtriser

Mais ce travail de refondation est extrêmement difficile et délicat. Il implique de ne pas mettre en cause un des fondements de la démocratie représentative, qui est la légitimité démocratique de l’élu. De même, il nécessite de renforcer la capacité des citoyens à dialoguer et à identifier les enjeux pour les prendre en charge non pas en fonction de leurs seuls intérêts, mais, eux aussi, de se placer au niveau collectif pour proposer des politiques communes, collectives, notamment publiques. J’insiste sur cette distinction, car, contrairement à ce que soutenait dernièrement un ministre communautaire, toutes les politiques publiques ne sont pas collectives. Une politique collective peut et devrait même, dans une logique de gouvernance par les acteurs, impliquer des moyens privés, associatifs et/ou citoyens. Reconnaissons que c’est rarement le cas.

Ainsi, prenons bien conscience que, pas plus que l’élu, le citoyen ne peut s’improviser gestionnaire public du jour au lendemain. Comme le souligne encore Luc Rouban dans son rapport publié à la Documentation française, la fragmentation de l’espace public et la complexité des procédures de décision ont rendu la démocratie incompréhensible à un nombre croissant de citoyens. L’ingénierie institutionnelle ne pourra pas résoudre ce problème qui appelle en revanche une véritable formation civique [11].

De même, la tâche difficile qui consiste à énoncer des politiques publiques ne s’improvise pas. La mise en forme de cet énoncé, que le politologue Philippe Zittoun désigne comme l’ensemble des discours, idées, analyses, catégories qui se stabilise autour d’une politique publique particulière et qui lui donne du sens, est ardue. En effet le travail de proposition d’action publique s’appuie sur un double processus : à la fois de greffe de cette proposition à un problème qu’elle permet de résoudre et de relation à une politique publique qu’elle voudrait transformer [12]. Tant le problème, que sa solution potentielle, que la politique publique à modifier doivent être connus et appropriés.

Les termes d’une équation comme celle-là doivent nous inviter à la modestie, sans jamais, toutefois, renoncer à cette ambition. Personne ne s’étonnera qu’ici je rappelle que, dans son souci de favoriser la bonne gouvernance démocratique, l’Institut Destrée, que j’ai l’honneur de piloter, définit la citoyenneté comme intelligence, émancipation personnelle et responsabilité à l’égard de la collectivité. De même, ce think tank inscrit-il parmi ses trois objectifs fondamentaux la compréhension critique par les citoyens des enjeux et des finalités de la société, du local au global, ainsi que la définition des axes stratégiques pour y répondre [13]. Dit plus simplement : si nous voulons résoudre les problèmes, il nous faut les maîtriser.

Investir dans les jeunes en matière d’emploi, de formation, de mobilité, de logement, de capacité internationale, en étant attentif au développement durable

La jeunesse n’est pas un âge de la vie, répétait le Général Douglas MacArthur, c’est un état d’esprit. Propos d’un homme de soixante ans, certes, et que je reprends volontiers à ma charge. Historiens, sociologues, psychologues et statisticiens se sont affrontés sans merci sur une définition de la jeunesse, qui est évidemment très relative selon l’époque de l’histoire, la civilisation, le sexe, etc. Parmi une multitude d’approches, on peut, avec Gérard Maurer, cumuler deux regards : le premier consiste à collecter les événements biographiques qui, comme autant de repères, marquent la sortie de l’enfance puis l’entrée dans l’âge adulte : décohabitation, sortie du système scolaire, accès à un emploi stable, formation d’un couple stable, sanctionné par le mariage ou non. La seconde approche, qui peut inclure la première, consiste à prendre en compte les processus temporels qui mènent de l’école à la vie professionnelle, de la famille d’origine à la famille conjugale, donc un double processus d’accès au marché du travail et au marché matrimonial, qui se clôture avec la stabilisation d’une position professionnelle et matrimoniale, pour parler comme le sociologue, mais en vous épargnant toutes les précautions d’usage [14]. De son côté, le professeur Jean-François Guillaume de l’Université de Liège, membre du Comité scientifique mis en place par le Parlement de Wallonie, intègre dans sa définition une dimension de volontarisme qui ne saurait déplaire au prospectiviste : la jeunesse contemporaine est généralement comprise comme une période où se profilent et se préparent les engagements de la vie adulte. Âge où les rêves peuvent s’exprimer et les projets prendre forme. Âge aussi où il faut faire des choix. Celui d’une formation ouverte sur l’insertion professionnelle n’est pas le moindre, car d’elle dépendent souvent encore l’indépendance résidentielle et l’engagement dans une relation conjugale [15].

À noter que, conscients de toutes ces difficultés de définition, et dans un souci de simplicité et devant la nécessité de définir le sujet tant pour l’approche statistique que pour l’analyse audiovisuelle qualitative, nous avons, avec le Parlement, décidé de cibler la tranche d’âge 18-29 ans, correspondant à la définition de l’INSEE, en l’arrondissant à 30 ans et en nous permettant de la souplesse dans l’application.

Chacun mesure dès lors la difficulté d’appréhender sur un sujet instable, en quelques jours, autant de problématiques aussi complexes (tissées ensemble dirait mon collègue Fabien Moustard, avec Edgar Morin) que l’emploi, la formation, la mobilité, le logement, la capacité internationale, en y intégrant l’angle du développement durable. C’est pourquoi, fort de l’expérience du panel citoyen sur la gestion du vieillissement, qui avait été amené à consacrer beaucoup de temps à formuler, puis à hiérarchiser les enjeux de long terme, nous avons souhaité préparer le processus de travail du panel citoyen Jeunes lors d’un séminaire dédié (Wallonia Policy Lab) qui s’est tenu le 3 février dernier autour d’une douzaine de jeunes volontaires. Sur base d’une mise en commun d’expériences personnelles, trois enjeux y ont été identifiés qui pourraient être plus particulièrement ciblés.

  1. Comment les acteurs, tant publics que privés, peuvent-ils mieux prendre en compte les besoins sociétaux émergents ?
  2. Comment remédier aux risques de précarisation et de dépendance des jeunes entre la sortie de l’enseignement obligatoire jusqu’au premier emploi soutenable ?
  3. Quelles sont les normes anciennes qui mériteraient d’être adaptées à nos façons de vivre actuelles, pour mieux répondre aux aspirations collectives et individuelles et ouvrir les nouvelles générations au monde ?

Ces enjeux constituent les portes d’entrée et la toile de fond pour aborder la problématique du panel. Celui-ci restera évidemment libre de se saisir ou non de la totalité ou d’une partie de ces questions.

Seule la contradiction permet de progresser

Ces enjeux systémiques sont des pistes à se réapproprier. Ou non, le panel restant souverain pour ces tâches. Il travaillera – c’est essentiel – comme a pu le faire celui de 2017 avec quatre principes de fonctionnement essentiels : (1) la courtoisie, pour cultiver la qualité d’une relation faite de bonne volonté constructive, d’écoute, d’empathie, de bienveillance, de dialogue respectueux des autres, d’élégance, d’amabilité et de politesse, (2) la robustesse, fondée sur l’ambition, la franchise, l’expérience davantage que l’idéologie, sur le pragmatisme, la solidité documentaire, la qualité du raisonnement, l’honnêteté, (3) l’efficacité par des interventions brèves, économes du temps et du stress de chacun, orientées vers le résultat, évitant la moralisation, enfin (4) la loyauté, le respect de l’engagement d’aboutir pris envers le Parlement et soucieux de la responsabilité qui nous est collective de porter l’expérience au bout de ses limites.

Comme nous l’avons dit lors du Policy Lab, en citant Jacques Ellul, il faut arriver à accepter que seule la contradiction permet de progresser. (…) La contradiction est la condition d’une communication [16].

L’essentiel, le fondement de l’intelligence collective est sans nul doute le fait de passer d’opinions personnelles largement fondées sur des représentations à une pensée commune coconstruite sur la connaissance des réalités. C’est à cette tâche que nous devons ensemble nous atteler pour chacun des problèmes envisagés.

En tout cas, pour tous ceux qui pensent qu’il vaut mieux réfléchir collectivement pour avancer ensemble.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

[1] Ce papier constitue la mise au net de l’intervention que j’ai faite lors de la séance de lancement du Panel citoyen « Jeunes » au Parlement de Wallonie, le 3 mars 2018.

[2] Voir Philippe DESTATTE, Qu’est-ce qu’un gouvernement ouvert ?, Blog PhD2050, Reims, 7 novembre 2017, https://phd2050.wordpress.com/2017/11/09/opengov-fr/

[3] Raymond ARON, Face aux tyrannies, Juin 1941, dans R. ARON, Croire en la démocratie (1933-1944), p. 132, Paris, Fayard, 2017.

[4] voir Marnix BEYEN et Philippe DESTATTE, Nouvelle Histoire de Belgique, 1970-nos jours, Un autre pays, p. 67-117, Bruxelles, Le Cri, 2008.

[5] Philippe DESTATTE, Marie DEWEZ et Christian de VISSCHER, Les ressorts d’une démocratie renouvelée, Du Mouvement wallon à la Wallonie en Mouvement, Rapport au Parlement wallon, 12 novembre 2015.

https://www.parlement-wallonie.be/media/doc/pdf/colloques/17112015/ch-de-visscher_ph-destatte_m-dewez_democratie_wallonne_2015-11-12.pdf

[6] La Wallonie au Futur, Le Défi de l’Education, Conférence-consensus, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 1995.

[7] Jacques BRASSINNE, Le Conseil régional wallon, 1974-1977, p. 103, Namur, Institut Destrée, 2007.

[8] Luc ROUBAN, La démocratie représentative est-elle en crise ?, p. 7-8, Paris, La Documentation française, 2018.

[9] Ibidem, p. 10-11.

[10] Patrice DURAN, Penser l’action publique, p. 97, Paris, LGDJ, 2010.

[11] Luc ROUBAN, op. cit., p. 187.

[12] Philippe ZITTOUN, La fabrique politique des politiques publiques, p. 20, Paris, Presses de Sciences Po, 2013.

[13] Les Assemblées générales du 2 octobre 2004 et du 21 juin 2012 ont approuvé le projet de Charte de l’Institut Destrée, qui constitue l’article 17 des statuts de l’asbl : ww.institut-destree.org/Statuts_et_Charte

[14] Gérard MAURER, Ages et générations, p. 77sv, Paris, La Découvertes, 2015.

[15] Jean-François GUILLAUME, Histoire de jeunes, Des identités en construction, p. 8, Paris, L’Harmattan, 1998.

[16] Jacques ELLUL, La raison d’être, Méditation sur l’Ecclésiaste, Paris, Seuil, 1987.

Liège, le 28 février 2018

1. Qu’est-ce que la prospective, en quoi est-elle stratégique ?

Telle que nous la connaissons aujourd’hui en Europe, la prospective constitue une rencontre entre des dynamiques françaises et latines, d’une part, anglo-saxonnes, de l’autre. Les évolutions entre ces deux sources apparaissent croisées. Ainsi, le foresight a-t-il évolué au fil du temps, de préoccupations militaires (améliorer les systèmes de défense) vers des objectifs industriels (accroître la compétitivité) et les questions sociétales (assurer le bien-être de la population, mettre le système en harmonie). Depuis les années 1960 jusqu’à nos jours, ses sujets de prédilection sont passés des sciences de base aux technologies-clefs, puis à l’analyse des systèmes d’innovation, enfin à l’étude du système sociétal dans sa totalité. De disciplinaire, orienté vers les sciences dites exactes, le foresight est devenu pluri, multi, et interdisciplinaire, ouvert aux sciences sociales [1]. Ainsi, s’est-il rapproché considérablement de la prospective, abandonnant une bonne partie des ambitions prévisionnistes héritées du forecasting pour devenir davantage stratégique.

La prospective française trouve notamment son origine dans la pensée du philosophe et entrepreneur Gaston Berger. Née d’une philosophie de l’action collective et de l’engagement, elle travaille les systèmes de valeurs et construit de la connaissance en vue du projet politique [2], s’affirmant elle aussi de plus en plus stratégique au contact des mondes des organisations internationales, des entreprises et de celui des territoires [3]. Prenant en compte le long terme et la longue durée, en postulant la pluralité des futurs possibles, faisant sienne l’analyse des systèmes complexes ainsi que mobilisant la théorie et la pratique de la modélisation, la prospective construit du désir et de la volonté stratégique pour mettre en mouvement et agir sur l’histoire. Ainsi que j’ai contribué à la définir dans des cadres européens (Mutual Learning Platform des DG Research, DG Enterprises & Industry, et DG Regio, appuyés par le Comité des Régions) [4], français (Collège européen de Prospective territoriale, créé dans le cadre de la DATAR à Paris) [5] ou wallon (Société wallonne de l’Evaluation et de la Prospective) [6], la prospective est une démarche indépendante, dialectique et rigoureuse, menée de manière transdisciplinaire en s’appuyant sur la longue durée. La prospective peut éclairer les questions du présent et de l’avenir, d’une part en les considérant dans leur cadre holistique, systémique et complexe et, d’autre part, en les inscrivant, au delà de l’historicité, dans la temporalité. Résolument tournée vers le projet et vers l’action, elle a vocation à provoquer une ou plusieurs transformations au sein du système qu’elle appréhende en mobilisant l’intelligence collective [7]. Cette définition, qui existe également en anglais, est celle à la fois de la prospective et du foresight. Elle a, en tout cas, été conçue comme telle, dans le cadre d’un véritable effort de convergence entre ces deux outils, porté notamment par l’équipe de l’Unité K2 de la DG RTD de la Commission européenne, alors dirigée par Paraskevas Caracostas.

Ce qui distingue fondamentalement la stratégie du processus de la prospective ou du foresight – certains disent prospective stratégique ou strategic foresight, ce qui constitue à mes yeux des pléonasmes -, c’est le fait que, dans la prospective, la stratégie qu’elle élabore n’est pas linéaire par rapport au diagnostic ou aux enjeux. Fondamentalement, la prospective s’arrime à la fois à des enjeux de long terme auxquels elle veut répondre et à une vision de l’avenir souhaitable, qu’elle a construite avec les acteurs concernés. Son processus, circulaire, mobilise à chaque étape l’intelligence collective et collaborative, pour donner réalité à une action désirée et co-construite, inscrite dans le long terme et se voulant efficiente et opérationnelle. La veille prospective s’active à chacune des étapes de ce processus. Je la définis comme une activité continue et en grande partie itérative d’observation active et d’analyse systémique de l’environnement, sur les court, moyen et long termes, pour anticiper les évolutions, identifier les enjeux du présent et de l’avenir, afin de construire des visions collectives et des stratégies d’actions. Elle s’articule à la création et à la gestion de la connaissance nécessaire pour nourrir le processus prospectif lui-même. Ce processus s’étend à partir du choix des chantiers d’opération (enjeux de long terme) et de la nécessaire heuristique, jusqu’à la communication et l’évaluation, en passant par l’analyse et la capitalisation des informations et leur transformation en connaissance utile [8].

2. La prospective à côté de l’intelligence stratégique

Le Groupe de Recherche en Intelligence stratégique (GRIS), ancré à HEC Liège, sous la direction de la professeure Claire Gruslin, voit l’intelligence stratégique comme un mode de gouvernance basé sur la maîtrise et la protection de l’information stratégique et pertinente, sur le potentiel d’influence, indispensable à tous les acteurs économiques soucieux de participer proactivement au développement et à l’innovation, en construisant un avantage distinctif durable dans un environnement hyper compétitif et turbulent [9].

De son côté, le célèbre Rapport Martre, daté de 1994, ouvrait, dans sa définition de l’intelligence économique, le champ d’un processus assez semblable de celui que j’ai évoqué pour la prospective, intégrant lui aussi la veille, l’heuristique, le questionnement des problématiques, la vision partagée, ainsi que la stratégie pour l’atteindre, articulés dans un cycle ininterrompu :

L’intelligence économique peut être définie comme l’ensemble des actions coordonnées de recherche, de traitement et de distribution en vue de son exploitation, de l’information utile aux acteurs économiques. Ces diverses actions sont menées légalement avec toutes les garanties de protection nécessaires à la préservation du patrimoine de l’entreprise, dans les meilleures conditions de qualité, de délais et de coût. L’information utile est celle dont ont besoin les différents niveaux de décision de l’entreprise ou de la collectivité, pour élaborer et mettre en œuvre de façon cohérente la stratégie et les tactiques nécessaires à l’atteinte des objectifs définis par l’entreprise dans le but d’améliorer sa position dans son environnement concurrentiel. Ces actions, au sein de l’entreprise, s’ordonnent en un cycle ininterrompu, générateur d’une vision partagée des objectifs à atteindre [10].

Ce qui est particulièrement intéressant dans la recherche de parallélismes ou de convergences entre intelligence économique et prospective, c’est l’idée, développée par Henri Martre, Philippe Clerc et Christian Harbulot que la notion d’intelligence économique dépasse la documentation, la veille, la protection des données, voire l’influence, pour s’inscrire dans une véritable intention stratégique et tactique, porteuse d’actions aux différents niveaux de l’activité, de la base de l’entreprise au niveau global, international [11].

 3. La prospective dans l’intelligence stratégique

Au tournant des années 2000, dans le cadre du programme européen ESTO (European Science and Technology Observatory), l’Institut d’Etudes en Prospective technologique (IPTS) de Séville avait rassemblé une série de chercheurs autour de l’idée d’intelligence stratégique comme réceptacle ou chapeau méthodologique orienté vers les politiques publiques. Cette démarche visait à reconnaître et prendre en compte la diversité de l’ensemble des méthodes mises à la disposition des décideurs, afin de les articuler et de les mobiliser au profit de la réussite des politiques publiques [12]. Comme l’indiquait alors un des animateurs de cette réflexion, Ken Ducatel, le concept d’intelligence stratégique n’offre pas seulement une force méthodologique pour répondre aux enjeux (de l’UE) mais dispose aussi de suffisamment de flexibilité pour se connecter à d’autres formes d’interactions, s’adapter à de nouveaux modèles de gouvernance et s’ouvrir à des changements technologiques et des évolutions sociales qui sont plus rapides que nous n’en n’avons jamais connus [13].

Lors du projet REGSTRAT, notamment porté en 2006 par Steinbeis Europa Zentrum à Stuttgart, la notion de Strategic Policy Intelligence Tools (SPI) – les outils d’intelligence appliqués aux politiques publiques – s’était imposée, notamment aux représentants de la Mutual Learning Platform, déjà évoquée. Comme nous l’indiquions avec mon collègue prospectiviste Günter Clar dans le rapport dédié au foresight, l’intelligence stratégique appliquée aux politiques publiques peut être définie comme un ensemble d’actions destinées à rechercher, mettre en œuvre, diffuser et protéger l’information en vue de la rendre disponible à la bonne personne, au moment adéquat, avec l’objectif de prendre la bonne décision. Ainsi que cela était clairement apparu lors des travaux, les outils du SPI comprennent la prospective, l’évaluation des choix technologiques, l’évaluation, le benchmarking, les démarches de qualité appliquées au territoire, etc. Ces outils sont utilisés pour fournir aux décideurs et aux parties prenantes une information claire, objective, non biaisée politiquement, indépendante et, le plus important, anticipatrice [14].

Ces travaux ont aussi permis de caractériser l’intelligence stratégique telle qu’observée dans ce contexte. Le contenu y apparaît taillé sur mesure, avec des côtés hard et soft, avec également un caractère distribué, sous-tendu par des effets d’échelle, la facilitation de l’apprentissage, un équilibre entre approches spécifique et générique, ainsi qu’une accessibilité accrue. Son processus s’articule sur la demande, la nécessité de la mobilisation de la créativité, une explicitation de la connaissance tacite, l’évaluation du potentiel technologique, une facilitation du processus, ainsi que le lien optimal avec la prise de décision [15].

Dans cette perspective, la prospective apparaît bien comme un outil, parmi d’autres, de l’intelligence stratégique, au service des décideurs et des parties prenantes.

4. Anticipation, innovation, décision

La direction générale de la Recherche et de l’Innovation de la Commission européenne s’investit depuis plusieurs années, dans les Forward Looking Activities (FLAs), les activités à vocation prospective [16], comme jadis – nous l’avons vu – l’Institut européen de Séville l’avait fait en développant, les outils d’intelligence stratégique [17] en politiques publiques (Strategic Policy Intelligence – SPI) [18]. Les FLA’s comprennent toutes les études et tous les processus systématiques et participatifs destinés à envisager les futurs possibles, de manière proactive et stratégique, ainsi qu’à examiner et tracer des chemins vers des objectifs souhaitables [19]. On retrouve évidemment dans ce champ un grand nombre de méthodes d’anticipation, d’évaluation des choix technologiques, d’évaluation ex ante, etc.

En 2001, Ruud Smits, préconisait trois axes qu’il considérait comme essentiels. D’abord, soulignait-il, il s’agit d’arrêter le débat sur les définitions et d’exploiter les synergies entre les différentes branches de l’intelligence stratégique. Ensuite, notait le professeur de Technologie et d’Innovation à l’Université d’Utrecht, il est nécessaire d’améliorer la qualité et de renforcer les sources existantes de l’intelligence stratégique. Enfin, Ruud Smits demandait que l’on développe une interface entre les sources de l’intelligence stratégique et leurs usagers [20]. Ce programme reste à mettre en œuvre et nous pourrions considérer que notre réflexion au GRIS s’inscrit dans cette ambition.

Cette approche cognitive nous renvoie sans nul doute à la distinction que prône le psychologue et Prix Nobel d’Economie Daniel Kahneman lorsqu’il met en évidence, d’une part, un Système cérébral n°1, qu’il voit comme automatique, direct, impulsif, quotidien, rapide, intuitif, sans effort réel, et que nous mobilisons dans 95% des circonstances. D’autre part, l’auteur de Thinking fast and slow, décrit un second système cérébral qui est à la fois conscient, rationnel, délibératif, lent, analytique, logique, celui que nous ne mobilisons que dans 5% des cas, notamment pour prendre des décisions quand nous nous mouvons dans des systèmes que nous appréhendons comme complexes [21]. C’est à ce moment, en effet, que nous devons faire l’effort de mobiliser des outils à la mesure des tâches dont nous nous saisissons.

Cette question affecte bien tous les outils d’intelligence stratégique, y compris la prospective. Non seulement parce que les investissements à fournir pour ces champs de recherche sont considérables, mais aussi parce que, souvent, beaucoup d’entre nous ne sont pas conscients de l’étendue de ce que nous ne pouvons saisir. Trop souvent en effet nous pensons que ce que nous voyons est ce qui existe. Nous nous limitons aux variables que nous pouvons détecter, embrasser, mesurer. Avec une capacité considérable de refuser de reconnaître les autres variables. Ce syndrome du WYSIATI (What you see is all there is) est, nous le savons dévastateur. Car il nous empêche de saisir la réalité dans toute son ampleur en nous laissant penser que nous maîtrisons l’espace et l’horizon. On ne peut pas s’empêcher de faire avec l’information qu’on a comme si on disposait de tout ce qu’on doit savoir, dit Kahneman [22].

Cette faille – il en est d’autres – doit nous inciter à unir nos forces pour surmonter les chapelles méthodologiques et épistémologiques et travailler à fonder des instruments plus robustes au service de politiques publiques plus volontaristes et mieux armées.

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

 

[1] Paraskevas CARACOSTAS & Ugar MULDUR, Society, The Endless Frontier, A European Vision of Research and Innovation Policies for the 21st Century, Brussels, European Commission, 1997. – Une première mouture de ce papier a été présentée lors du colloque du Groupe de REcherche en Intelligence stratégique (GRIS) à HEC Liège, le 28 septembre 2016.

[2] (…) en appliquant les principes de l’analyse intentionnelle, propre à la phénoménologie, à l’expérience du temps, Gaston Berger substitue au «mythe du temps» une norme temporelle, construction intersubjective pour l’action collective. Sa philosophie de la connaissance se constitue ainsi comme une science de la pratique prospective dont la finalité́ est normative : elle est orientée vers le travail des valeurs et la construction d’un projet politique ; elle est une «philosophie en action ». Chloë VIDAL, La prospective territoriale dans tous ses états, Rationalités, savoirs et pratiques de la prospective (1957-2014), p. 31, Lyon, Thèse ENS, 2015.

[3] Sur la prospective territoriale, rencontre entre les principes de la prospective et ceux du développement territorial, voir la référence au colloque international de la DATAR en mars 1968. Chloë VIDAL, La prospective territoriale dans tous ses états, Rationalités, savoirs et pratiques de la prospective (1957-2014), p. 214-215, Lyon, ENS, 2015.

[4] Günter CLAR & Philippe DESTATTE, Regional Foresight, Boosting Regional Potential, Mutual Learning Platform Regional Foresight Report, Luxembourg, European Commission, Committee of the Regions and Innovative Regions in Europe Network, 2006.

http://www.institut-destree.eu/Documents/Reseaux/Günter-CLAR_Philippe-DESTATTE_Boosting-Regional-Potential_MLP-Foresight-2006.pdf

[5] Ph. DESTATTE & Ph. DURANCE dir., Les mots-clefs de la prospective territoriale, p. 43, Paris, DIACT-DATAR, La Documentation française, 2009.

[6] Ph. DESTATTE, Evaluation, prospective et développement régional, p. 381, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 2001.

[7] Philippe DESTATTE, Qu’est-ce que la prospective ?, Blog PhD2050, 10 avril 2013.

https://phd2050.wordpress.com/2013/04/10/prospective/

[8] René-Charles TISSEYRE, Knowledge Management, Théorie et pratique de la gestion des connaissances, Paris, Hermès-Lavoisier, 1999.

[9] Guy GOERMANNE, Note de réflexion, Tentatives de rapprochement entre la prospective et l’intelligence stratégique en Wallonie, p. 7, Bruxelles, Août 2016, 64 p.

[10] Henri MARTRE, Philippe CLERC, Christian HARBULOT, Intelligence économique et stratégie des entreprises, p. 12-13, Paris, Commissariat général au Plan – La Documentation française, Février 1994. http://bdc.aege.fr/public/Intelligence_Economique_et_strategie_des_entreprises_1994.pdf

[11] La notion d’intelligence économique implique le dépassement des actions partielles désignées par les vocables de documentation, de veille (scientifique et technologique, concurrentielle, financière, juridique et réglementaire…), de protection du patrimoine concurrentiel, d’influence (stratégie d’influence des États-nations, rôle des cabinets de consultants étrangers, opérations d’information et de désinformation…). Ce dépassement résulte de l’intention stratégique et tactique, qui doit présider au pilotage des actions partielles et su succès des actions concernées, ainsi que de l’interaction entre tous les niveaux de l’activité, auxquels s’exerce la fonction d’intelligence économique : depuis la base (internes à l’entreprise) en passant par des niveaux intermédiaires (interprofessionnels, locaux) jusqu’aux niveaux nationaux (stratégies concertées entre les différents centres de décision), transnationaux (groupes multinationaux) ou internationaux (stratégies d’influence des États-nations). H. MARTRE, Ph. CLERC, Ch. HARBULOT, Intelligence économique et stratégie des entreprises…, p. 12-13.

[12] L’intelligence stratégique peut-être définie comme un ensemble d’actions destinées à rechercher, mettre en œuvre, diffuser et protéger l’information en vue de la rendre disponible à la bonne personne, au moment adéquat avec l’objectif de prendre la bonne décision. (…) L’intelligence stratégique appliquée aux politiques publiques offre une variété de méthodologies afin de rencontrer les demandes des décideurs politiques. Derived from Daniel ROUACH, La veille technologique et l’intelligence économique, Paris, PUF, 1996, p. 7 & Intelligence économique et stratégie d’entreprises, Paris, Commissariat général au Plan, 1994. – Alexander TÜBKE, Ken DUCATEL, James P. GAVIGAN, Pietro MONCADA-PATERNO-CASTELLO éd., Strategic Policy Intelligence: Current Trends, the State of the Play and perspectives, S&T Intelligence for Policy-Making Processes, p. V & VII, IPTS, Seville, Dec. 2001.

[13] Ibidem, p. IV.

[14] Günter CLAR & Ph. DESTATTE, Mutual Learning Platform Regional Foresight Report, p. 4, Luxembourg, IRE, EC-CoR, 2006.

[15] Ruud SMITS, The New Role of Strategic Intelligence, in A. TÜBKE, K. DUCATEL, J. P. GAVIGAN, P. MONCADA-PATERNO-CASTELLO éd., Strategic Policy Intelligence: Current Trends, p. 17.

[16] Domenico ROSSETTI di VALDALBERO & Parla SROUR-GANDON, European Forward Looking Activities, EU Research in Foresight and Forecast, Socio-Economic Sciences & Humanities, List of Activities, Brussels, European Commission, DGR, Directorate L, Science, Economy & Society, 2010. http://ec.europa.eu/research/social-sciences/forward-looking_en.htmlEuropean forward-looking activities, Building the future of « Innovation Union » and ERA, Brussels, European Commission, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation, 2011. ftp://ftp.cordis.europa.eu/pub/fp7/ssh/docs/european-forward-looking-activities_en.pdf

[17] Strategic Intelligence is all about feeding actors (including policy makers) with the tailor made information they need to play their role in innovation systems (content) and with bringing the together to interact (amongst others to create common ground). Ruud SMITS, Technology Assessment and Innovation Policy, Séville, 5 Dec. 2002. ppt.

[18] A. TÜBKE, K. DUCATEL, J. P. GAVIGAN, P. MONCADA-PATERNO-CASTELLO éd., Strategic Policy Intelligence: Current Trends, …

[19] Innovation Union Information and Intelligence System I3S – EC 09/06/2011.

[20] R. SMITS, The New Role of Strategic Intelligence…, p. 17. – voir aussi R. SMITS & Stefan KUHLMANN, Strenghtening interfaces in innovation systems: rationale, concepts and (new) instruments, Strata Consolidating Workshop, Brussels, 22-23 April 2002, RTD-K2, June 2002. – R. SMITS, Stefan KUHLMANN and Philip SHAPIRA eds., The Theory and Practice of Innovation Policy, An International Research Handbook, Cheltenham UK, Northampton MA USA, Edward Elgar, 2010.

[21] Daniel KAHNEMAN, Thinking fast and slow, p. 201, New York, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2011.

[22] You cannot help dealing with limited information you have as it were all there is to know. D. KAHNEMAN, Thinking fast and slow…, p. 201.

Liège, January 19, 2018

1. What is foresight, and in what way is it strategic? [1]

 In the form in which we know it today in Europe, foresight represents an encounter and interaction between French and Latin developments, on the one hand, and those in the Anglosphere on the other. In English-speaking countries, the practice of foresight has evolved over time from a concern with military interests (such as improving defence systems) to industrial objectives (such as increasing competitiveness) and societal issues (such as ensuring the welfare of the population or ensuring social harmony). Since the 1960s, its chosen field has shifted from fundamental science to key technologies, then to the analysis of innovation systems, and finally to the study of the entire societal system. Having started out within a single discipline, namely the exact sciences, foresight has become pluridisciplinary, multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary, with an openness to the social sciences [2]. In doing so, it has moved considerably closer to the French approach, abandoning many of its earlier forecasting ambitions for a more strategic focus.

The French school of foresight (referred to as la prospective) originates in the thought of the philosopher and entrepreneur Gaston Berger. Deriving from a philosophy of collective action and engagement, it deals with value systems and constructs knowledge for political purposes [3], and has likewise become increasingly strategic in nature through contact with the worlds of international organisations, companies and regional territories [4]. Taking account of the long-term and la longue durée by postulating the plurality of possible futures, adopting the analysis of complex systems and deploying the theory and practice of modelling, foresight generates a strategic desire and willingness in order to influence and affect history. As I have helped to define it in various contexts – European (the Mutual Learning Platform of DG Research, DG Enterprise & Industry, and DG Regional & Urban Policy, supported by the Committee of the Regions) [5], French (the European Regional Foresight College) created under the auspices of the Interministerial Delegation of Land Planning and Regional Attractiveness (DATAR) in Paris) [6] or in Wallonia (the Wallonia Evaluation and Foresight Society) [7] – foresight is an independent, dialectical and rigorous process, conducted in a transdisciplinary way and taking in the longer sweep of history. It can shed light on questions of the present and the future, firstly by considering them in a holistic, systemic and complex framework, and secondly by setting them in a temporal context over and beyond historicity. Concerned above all with planning and action, its purpose is to provoke one or more transformations within the system that it apprehends by mobilising collective intelligence [8]. This definition is that of both la prospective and foresight; at any rate it was designed as such, as part of a serious effort to bring about convergence between these two tools undertaken by, in particular, the team of Unit K2 of DG Research and Innovation at the European Commission, led at the time by Paraskevas Caracostas.

The main distinguishing characteristic of the strategy behind the process of la prospective or foresight – some refer to la prospective stratégique or strategic foresight, which to my mind are pleonasms – is that it does not have a linear relationship with the diagnosis or the issues. Fundamentally, this tool reflects both the long-term issues it seeks to address and a vision of a desirable future that it has constructed with the actors concerned. Its circular process mobilises collective and collaborative intelligence at every step in order to bring about in reality a desired and jointly constructed action that operates over the long term and is intended to be efficient and operational. Foresight watch takes place at every step of this process. I define this as a continuous and largely iterative activity of active observation and systemic analysis of the environment, in the short, medium and long term, to anticipate developments and identify present and future issues with the ultimate purpose of forming collective visions and action strategies. It is based on creating and managing the knowledge needed as input into the process of foresight itself. This process extends from the choice of areas to work on (long-term issues) and of the necessary heuristic, via the analysis and capitalisation of information and its transformation into useful knowledge, to communication and evaluation [9].

2. Foresight and strategic intelligence

The Strategic Intelligence Research Group (GRIS) at HEC Liège, under the direction of Professor Claire Gruslin, sees strategic intelligence as ‘a mode of governance based on the acquisition and protection of strategic and relevant information and on the potential for influence, which is essential for all economic actors wishing to participate proactively in development and innovation by building a distinctive and lasting advantage in a highly competitive and turbulent environment[10].

For its part, the famous Martre Report of 1994, in its definition of economic intelligence, delineated a process fairly similar to that which I mentioned for foresight, likewise including monitoring, heuristics, the examination of issues, a shared vision and the strategy to achieve it, all set in a ‘continuous cycle’:

Economic intelligence can be defined as the set of coordinated actions by which information that is useful to economic actors is sought out, processed and distributed for exploitation. These various actions are carried out legally and benefit from the protection necessary to preserve the company’s assets, under optimal quality, time and cost conditions. Useful information is that needed by the different decision-making levels in the company or the community in order to develop and implement in a coherent manner the strategy and tactics necessary to achieve its objectives, with the goal of improving its position in its competitive context. These actions within the company are organised in a continuous cycle, generating a shared vision of the objectives to be achieved[11].

What is of particular interest in the search for parallels or convergences between economic intelligence and foresight is the idea, developed by Henri Martre, Philippe Clerc and Christian Harbulot, that the notion of economic intelligence goes beyond documentation, monitoring, data protection or even influence, to become part of ‘a true strategic and tactical intention’, supporting actions at different levels, from the company up to the global, international level[12].

 3. Foresight in strategic intelligence

At the turn of the millennium, as part of the European ESTO (European Science and Technology Observatory) programme, the Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS) in Seville gathered a series of researchers to examine the idea of ​​strategic intelligence as a methodological vehicle or umbrella for public policy-making. The idea was to recognise and take account of the diversity of methods made available to decision-makers in order to structure and mobilise them to ensure successful policy-making [13]. As Ken Ducatel, one of the coordinators of this discussion, put it, ‘The concept of strategic intelligence not only offers a powerful methodology for addressing (EU) issues, but has the flexibility to connect to other forms of interaction, adapt to new models of governance and open up to technological changes and social developments that are faster than we have ever known before[14].

At the time of the REGSTRAT project coordinated by the Stuttgart-based Steinbeis Europa Zentrum in 2006, the concept of Strategic Policy Intelligence (SPI) tools – i.e. intelligence tools applied to public policy – had become accepted, in particular among the representatives of the Mutual Learning Platform referred to earlier. As my fellow foresight specialist Günter Clar and I pointed out in the report on the subject of foresight, strategic intelligence as applied to public policy can be defined as a set of actions designed to identify, implement, disseminate and protect information in order to make it available to the right person, at the right time, with the goal of making the right decision. As had become clear during the work, SPI’s tools include foresight, evaluation of technological choices, evaluation, benchmarking, quality procedures applied to territories, and so on. These tools are used to provide decision-makers and stakeholders with clear, objective, politically unbiased, independent and, most importantly, anticipatory information [15].

This work also made it possible to define strategic intelligence as observed in this context. Its content is adapted to the context, with hard and soft sides and a distributed character, underpinned by scale effects, the facilitation of learning, a balance between specific and generic approaches and increased accessibility. Its process is based on demand, the need to mobilise creativity, making tacit knowledge explicit, the evaluation of technological potential, a facilitation of the process and an optimal link with decision-making [16].

From this viewpoint, foresight is clearly one of the tools of strategic intelligence for the use of policy-makers and stakeholders.

 Anticipation, innovation and decision-making

The Directorate General for Research and Innovation of the European Commission has been involved for some years in forward-looking activities (FLAs) [17], just as the European Institute in Seville had been – as we saw – when it developed strategic policy intelligence (SPI) [18] tools for use in public policy-making[19]. FLAs include all systematic and participatory studies and processes designed to consider possible futures, proactively and strategically, and to explore and map out paths towards desirable goals [20]. This field obviously includes numerous different methods for anticipation of future developments, evaluation of technological choices, ex-ante evaluation, and so on.

In 2001, Ruud Smits, Professor of Technology and Innovation at the University of Utrecht, made three recommendations that he regarded as essential. First, he stressed, it was time to call a halt to the debate about definitions and to exploit the synergies between the different branches of strategic intelligence. Next, he noted the need to improve the quality of strategic intelligence and reinforce its existing sources. Finally, Smits called for the development of an interface between strategic intelligence sources and their users[21]. This programme has yet to be implemented, and our work at GRIS could be seen as reflecting this ambition.

This cognitive approach without a doubt brings us back to the distinction put forward by psychologist and Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman, who refers in his book Thinking fast and slow to two cerebral systems. He describes System 1 as automatic, direct, impulsive, everyday, fast, intuitive, and involving no real effort; we use it in 95% of circumstances. System 2, by contrast, is conscious, rational, deliberative, slow, analytical and logical; we only use it 5% of the time, especially to make decisions when we find ourselves in systems that we consider complex[22]. It is at such times that we have to make the effort to mobilise tools suited to the tasks we are tackling.

This question concerns all strategic intelligence tools, including foresight. Not just because the investments to be made in these fields of research are considerable, but because, often, many of us are unaware of the extent of that which we are unable to understand. All too commonly, we think that what we can see represents the full extent of what exists. We confine ourselves to the variables that we are able to detect, embrace and measure, and have a considerable capacity to refuse to recognise other variables. We know that this syndrome of WYSIATI (‘what you see is all there is’) is devastating: it prevents us from grasping reality in its entirety by making us think that we are in full command of the territory around us and the horizon. As Kahneman puts it, ‘You cannot help dealing with limited information you have as if it were all there is to know[23].

This flaw – and there are others – should encourage us to join forces to cross methodological and epistemological boundaries and work to create more robust instruments that can be used to design more proactive and better-equipped public policies.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

 

[1] A first version of this paper was presented at the Liège Business School on September 28, 2016.

[2] Paraskevas CARACOSTAS & Ugar MULDUR, Society, The Endless Frontier, A European Vision of Research and Innovation Policies for the 21st Century, Brussels, European Commission, 1997.

[3] ‘(…) By applying the principles of intentional analysis associated with phenomenology to the experience of time, Gaston Berger substitutes for the “myth of time” a temporal norm, an intersubjective construct for collective action. His philosophy of knowledge is thus constituted as a science of foresight practice whose purpose is normative: it is oriented towards work on values and the construction of a political project; it is a “philosophy in action”.‘ Chloë VIDAL, La prospective territoriale dans tous ses états, Rationalités, savoirs et pratiques de la prospective (1957-2014), p. 31, Lyon, Thèse ENS, 2015. Our translation.

[4] On la prospective territoriale, representing an encounter between the principles of foresight and those of regional development, see the reference to the DATAR international conference in March 1968. Chloë VIDAL, La prospective territoriale dans tous ses états, Rationalités, savoirs et pratiques de la prospective (1957-2014)…, p. 214-215.

[5] Günter CLAR & Philippe DESTATTE, Regional Foresight, Boosting Regional Potential, Mutual Learning Platform Regional Foresight Report, Luxembourg, European Commission, Committee of the Regions and Innovative Regions in Europe Network, 2006.

http://www.institut-destree.eu/Documents/Reseaux/Günter-CLAR_Philippe-DESTATTE_Boosting-Regional-Potential_MLP-Foresight-2006.pdf

[6] Ph. DESTATTE & Ph. DURANCE eds, Les mots-clefs de la prospective territoriale, p. 43, Paris, DIACT-DATAR, La Documentation française, 2009.

[7] Ph. DESTATTE, Evaluation, prospective et développement régional, p. 381, Charleroi, Institut Destrée, 2001.

[8] Ph. Destatte, What is foresight ?, Blog PhD2050, May 30, 2013.

https://phd2050.wordpress.com/2013/05/30/what-is-foresight/

[9] René-Charles TISSEYRE, Knowledge Management, Théorie et pratique de la gestion des connaissances, Paris, Hermès-Lavoisier, 1999.

[10] Guy GOERMANNE, Note de réflexion, Tentatives de rapprochement entre la prospective et l’intelligence stratégique en Wallonie, p. 7, Brussels, August 2016, 64 p.

[11] Henri MARTRE, Philippe CLERC, Christian HARBULOT, Intelligence économique et stratégie des entreprises, p. 12-13, Paris, Commissariat général au Plan (Plan Commission) – La Documentation française, February 1994.

http://bdc.aege.fr/public/Intelligence_Economique_et_strategie_des_entreprises_1994.pdf

[12] ‘The notion of economic intelligence implies transcending the piecemeal actions designated by the terms documentation, monitoring (scientific and technological, competitive, financial, legal and regulatory etc.), protection of competitive capital, and influencing (strategy for influencing nation-states, role of foreign consultancies, information and misinformation operations, etc). It succeeds in transcending these things as a result of the strategic and tactical intention which is supposed to preside over the steering of piecemeal actions and over ensuring their success, and of the interaction between all levels of activity at which the economic intelligence function is exercised: from the grassroots (within companies), through intermediate levels (interprofessional, local), up to the national (concerted strategies between different decision-making centres), transnational (multinational groups) or international (strategies for influencing nation-states) levels.’ H. MARTRE, Ph. CLERC, Ch. HARBULOT, Intelligence économique et stratégie des entreprises…, p. 12-13. Our translation.

[13] Strategic intelligence can be defined as a set of actions designed to identify, implement, disseminate and protect information in order to make it available to the right person, at the right time, with the goal of making the right decision. (…) Strategic intelligence applied to public policy offers a variety of methodologies to meet the requirements of policy-makers. Derived from Daniel ROUACH, La veille technologique et l’intelligence économique, Paris, PUF, 1996, p. 7 & Intelligence économique et stratégie d’entreprises, Paris, Commissariat général au Plan (Plan Commission), 1994. Alexander TÜBKE, Ken DUCATEL, James P. GAVIGAN, Pietro MONCADA-PATERNO-CASTELLO eds, Strategic Policy Intelligence: Current Trends, the State of the Play and perspectives, S&T Intelligence for Policy-Making Processes, p. V & VII, IPTS, Seville, Dec. 2001.

[14] Ibidem, p. IV.

[15] Günter CLAR & Ph. DESTATTE, Mutual Learning Platform Regional Foresight Report, p. 4, Luxembourg, IRE, EC-CoR, 2006.

[16] Ruud SMITS, The New Role of Strategic Intelligence, in A. TÜBKE, K. DUCATEL, J. P. GAVIGAN, P. MONCADA-PATERNO-CASTELLO eds, Strategic Policy Intelligence: Current Trends, p. 17.

[17] Domenico ROSSETTI di VALDALBERO & Parla SROUR-GANDON, European Forward Looking Activities, EU Research in Foresight and Forecast, Socio-Economic Sciences & Humanities, List of Activities, Brussels, European Commission, DGR, Directorate L, Science, Economy & Society, 2010. http://ec.europa.eu/research/social-sciences/forward-looking_en.htmlEuropean forward-looking activities, Building the future of « Innovation Union » and ERA, Brussels, European Commission, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation, 2011. ftp://ftp.cordis.europa.eu/pub/fp7/ssh/docs/european-forward-looking-activities_en.pdf

[18] ‘Strategic Intelligence is all about feeding actors (including policy makers) with the tailor made information they need to play their role in innovation systems (content) and with bringing them together to interact (amongst others to create common ground).’ Ruud SMITS, Technology Assessment and Innovation Policy, Seville, 5 Dec. 2002. ppt.

[19] A. TÜBKE, K. DUCATEL, J. P. GAVIGAN, P. MONCADA-PATERNO-CASTELLO eds, Strategic Policy Intelligence: Current Trends, …

[20] Innovation Union Information and Intelligence System I3S – EC 09/06/2011.

[21] R. SMITS, The New Role of Strategic Intelligence…, p. 17. – see also R. SMITS & Stefan KUHLMANN, Strengthening interfaces in innovation systems: rationale, concepts and (new) instruments, Strata Consolidating Workshop, Brussels, 22-23 April 2002, RTD-K2, June 2002. – R. SMITS, Stefan KUHLMANN and Philip SHAPIRA eds, The Theory and Practice of Innovation Policy, An International Research Handbook, Cheltenham UK, Northampton MA USA, Edward Elgar, 2010.

[22] Daniel KAHNEMAN, Thinking fast and slow, p. 201, New York, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2011.

[23] D. KAHNEMAN, Thinking fast and slow, p. 201.

Namur, le 6 janvier 2018

Depuis août 2017, une importante transformation s’est réalisée au premier étage du siège du gouvernement wallon à Namur et plus particulièrement dans les locaux qui servent de bureaux au nouveau ministre-président et à son équipe rapprochée. Une animation nouvelle est apparue qui a troublé l’image figée que donnait ce décor depuis près de dix ans. Les portes-fenêtres qui donnent sur le balcon se sont ouvertes, laissant entrevoir des va-et-vient qui succèdent ainsi à l’immobilité qui s’était installée sous les deux ministres-présidents précédents. Plus visible encore, avec l’automne puis l’hiver, pour ceux qui se déplacent sur le quai de Meuse que constitue l’avenue Baron Louis Huart, l’Elysette, de l’autre côté du fleuve, s’est illuminée et cette lumière, continue à veiller assez tard, tout comme le président du gouvernement de Wallonie qui y travaille.

Deux changements paraissent être intervenus. D’une part, le président de l’Exécutif exerce sa responsabilité à temps plein, et ce depuis Namur. D’autre part, le gouvernement marque son intention d’exercer ses prérogatives en pleine souveraineté.

Gouverner la Wallonie est une responsabilité qui doit s’exercer à temps plein

Le constat pourrait paraître banal. Il ne l’est pas. Absorbé par son grand intérêt pour son territoire de la Wallonie picarde puis, après 2011, par ses autres responsabilités de président du gouvernement de la Communauté Wallonie-Bruxelles, le ministre-président Rudy Demotte avait rompu avec cette volonté concrétisée depuis Jean-Maurice Dehousse et Bernard Anselme d’ancrer le pouvoir wallon à Namur. Absorbé par d’autres préoccupations locales – la situation dégradée de Charleroi appelait un bourgmestre très présent – ou par des tâches qui lui semblaient plus valorisantes, Paul Magnette n’aura, lui non plus, de 2014 à 2017, jamais vraiment donné l’impression d’occuper les lieux, autrement que ponctuellement, au rythme du Conseil des ministres ou de l’agenda parlementaire.

Or le redéploiement de la Wallonie nécessite de disposer d’un capitaine à plein temps, ce que symbolise aujourd’hui la permanence des lumières de l’Elysette.

Cela nous réjouit fortement et le mettre au crédit du ministre-président Willy Borsus, dont on sait depuis longtemps qu’il est un travailleur assidu et déterminé, ne constitue pas une flagornerie de début de mandat. Il s’agit plutôt d’une réelle occasion de rappeler une vérité d’importance : gouverner la Wallonie est une responsabilité qui doit s’exercer à temps plein.

Ce pouvoir doit s’exercer pleinement là où il est ancré sur le plan politique.

Ancien secrétaire d’État à la Réforme des institutions à l’époque du Pacte d’Egmont, le ministre Jacques Hoyaux, qui présida l’Institut Destrée, a souvent souligné à quel point la localisation des institutions est importante, considérant qu’élues, élus et fonctionnaires ne réfléchissent pas de la même manière et ne comprennent pas les intérêts wallons de la même façon, s’ils sont au travail à Bruxelles ou en Wallonie [1]. De même, dans la République, souligne-t-on souvent que les députées et les députés sont des élus nationaux et non locaux, et qu’on ne gouverne pas la France depuis sa circonscription. Comment pourrait-il en être différemment en Wallonie, même dans un polycentrisme politique des grandes villes-capitales, dès lors que le Parlement, incarnation de la démocratie représentative et même souvent délibérative, est au confluent de la Meuse et de la Sambre ?

Certes, la question de la localisation des partis politiques reste problématique. Si nous savons l’importance qu’ils jouent dans le fonctionnement multiniveaux du fédéralisme belge, nous devons bien constater qu’un seul d’entre eux a son siège à Namur et que l’habitude de tenir des bureaux ou comités dans la capitale politique régionale semble – pour autant que nous puissions en juger de l’extérieur – relever de la rareté.

La cohérence entre le débat sociétal, l’espace médiatique, l’exercice des démocraties représentatives et délibératives, la décision politique, sa mise en œuvre par l’Administration et les opérateurs pertinents doit être assumée au grand jour, les dispositifs étant localisés, même dans une société de plus en plus numérique. Nous dirions que c’est surtout dans celle-là que, étant aux commandes, une personnalité politique élue ne peut être partout et donc nulle part. Dit autrement, la décision politique wallonne ne peut être un spectre qui se promène la lanterne à la main entre le boulevard de l’Empereur, l’avenue de la Toison d’Or, la rue des Deux Églises, et je ne sais quelle autre chapelle.

Je le répète : que le pouvoir exécutif wallon nous paraisse actuellement localisé clairement à l’Elysette, à quelques centaines de mètres du Parlement de Wallonie, nous réjouit. Mieux, une passerelle devrait bientôt encore rapprocher ces deux institutions majeures, les renforçant mutuellement au cœur de Namur Capitale.

Exercer ses prérogatives en pleine souveraineté

Le pouvoir régional doit également s’exercer pleinement sur le plan de l’initiative et de la responsabilité politique. Bien que depuis longtemps adepte de la co-construction des politiques collectives ou publiques, promoteur de la gouvernance démocratique par les acteurs et du Partenariat pour un Gouvernement ouvert, nous ne pouvons comprendre un discours comme celui qui valoriserait un soi-disant « modèle mosan ». Ce flou conceptuel s’est révélé comme un modèle vide dans lequel le gouvernement abandonne aux partenaires sociaux son pouvoir d’impulsion par rapport à la mise en œuvre de politiques régionales. Ce modèle a abouti à devoir constater une incapacité de décider et d’agir du politique dans une Wallonie qui nécessite toujours les réformes de structure appelée jadis de leurs vœux par les renardistes. Et je ne parle bien sûr pas d’anticapitalisme, mais de ce fédéralisme qui, comme le revendiquait le leader de la FGTB dès les années 1950, bannirait le chômage de la Wallonie [2].

On reste en effet abasourdi par le mea culpa d’un ancien ministre-président lorsqu’il confie que, lors de son arrivée à l’Elysette, il avait dans l’idée de tout changer – ce qui nous apparaissait alors bien nécessaire [3] – mais que sa consultation avec les partenaires sociaux l’en a dissuadé parce que les outils mis en place, notamment le Plan Marshall, fonctionnaient bien [4]. Que la concertation empêche le politique d’agir quand il faut agir constitue, de toute évidence, une dérive du système, en particulier quand la plupart des indicateurs sont au rouge et que les enjeux de long terme sont clairement identifiés. Même s’ils doivent être respectés, les interlocuteurs sociaux – patronat, indépendants et classes moyennes, syndicats de tout poil -, pas plus que les autres acteurs, n‘ont pas à gouverner à la place des élues et des élus ni à empêcher leurs initiatives. Sauf à verser à nouveau dans un conservatisme et un immobilisme qui marginalise plus fortement encore la Wallonie en Europe et dans le monde.

 

Un renouveau tellement nécessaire

Or, le temps passe, et les législatures et les mandats de ceux qui n’ont pas su redéployer la Wallonie sont définitivement expirés. Les échecs d’hier ne constituent nullement la garantie des succès de demain. La Wallonie n’appartient à aucune organisation syndicale ni à aucun parti politique : ne doutons pas que, par de nouvelles configurations, demain sera construit différemment d’aujourd’hui.

Si les fenêtres se sont rouvertes, si les lumières se sont rallumées à l’Elysette, c’est le signe d’une nouvelle volonté de dialogue et de travail communs déjà ressentie, exprimée et entendue dans l’administration wallonne, les entreprises et les organisations. Nombreux sont ceux qui, ces derniers mois, ont souligné que quelque chose de positif se passe, que la Wallonie est en train d’enfin comprendre, mesurer et préparer un renouveau qui apparaît chaque jour plus nécessaire. Celui-ci pourrait, à court terme, prendre la forme d’un projet qui serait concrétisé à moyen terme. Mais, bien entendu, tous les scepticismes sont loin d’être surmontés tandis que certains, à la lecture des résultats du PTB dans les sondages, cultivent à nouveau le vieux rêve du front de gauche wallon et du socialisme dans un seul pays… croyant, par là, pouvoir échapper aux efforts de redéploiement de la Wallonie. Bien entendu, il existe en Wallonie une gauche et un socialisme qui n’ont jamais déserté les intérêts wallons, jamais pratiqué l’imposture ni l’inconstance. Des compagnons et successeurs de Freddy Terwagne et d’Alfred Califice, la Wallonie en aura toujours grand besoin.

Espérons que la mise en œuvre d’un projet concret, fondé sur la recherche, l’innovation et l’entrepreneuriat se réalise rapidement et qu’elle surmonte les difficultés d’un calendrier électoral compliqué autant que de manœuvres politiques qui ne devraient pourtant pas, du moins en théorie, pouvoir peser sur un redressement longuement attendu par les citoyennes et les citoyens. Nous ne rappellerons jamais assez que les échéances sont assez claires pour la Wallonie : en 2024 la loi de financement sortira en effet du mécanisme de transition qui maintenait à un niveau constant les transferts en termes nominaux pendant dix ans. Le financement complémentaire transitoire de compensation diminuera de manière linéaire de 10% par an, jusqu’à disparaître complètement en 2035. Se préparer à cette évolution nous impose d’ajuster nos indicateurs principaux sur la moyenne européenne, ce qui – n’en doutons pas – représente un effort considérable et implique une gestion volontariste et proactive.

La nécessité d‘une réelle gouvernance wallonne qui assume pleinement ses responsabilités face à la population, face aux acteurs sociaux et aux autres niveaux de pouvoir est plus grande que jamais. Cela signifie, comme l’indiquaient des membres du Collège régional de Prospective dans leur appel du 7 mars 2017 [5], l’obligation de concevoir une bifurcation majeure de la Wallonie par laquelle les entreprises produisent suffisamment de valeur ajoutée pour parvenir à une harmonie sociale, rendant confiance et assurant un minimum de bien-être pour toutes et tous.

Ce nouvel élan nécessite également, comme le nouveau ministre-président l’a rappelé à la plupart de ses interventions, qu’un mouvement se déclenche autour de ces idées pour qu’elles soient mises en œuvre collectivement. C’est un mouvement collectif qu’il s’agit d’initier. C’est l’ambition d’un pacte sociétal qui réunisse toutes les forces vives, tous les acteurs volontaristes et entreprenants, dans un effort commun, un engagement puissant qui fasse litière des vieilles rancœurs et place l’intérêt général ainsi que le bien commun au centre des préoccupations des Wallonnes et des Wallons.

Pour que les lumières, qui éclairent désormais l’Elysette, s’allument partout ailleurs en Wallonie.

 

Philippe Destatte

@PhD2050

Sur le même sujet :

Ph. DESTATTE, Le changement de gouvernement à Namur : après l’inertie, la continuité ?, Blog PhD2050, Namur, le 17 septembre 2017.

Ph. DESTATTE, La bifurcation oubliée, la trajectoire espérée, Blog PhD2050, Hour-en-Famenne, le 29 août 2017.

 

[1] Namur, centre administratif wallon, Propos de Jacques Hoyaux recueillis par Joseph BOLY, dans Rénovation, 21 avril 1971, p. 8-9. – Wallonie libre, Mars 1971, p. 1sv.

[2] André RENARD, Intervention au Congrès national wallon du 26 mars 1950. – FHMW, Fonds Fernand Schreurs, Congrès national wallon, Congrès, 1950, Congrès du 26 mars 1950.

[3] J’écrivais le 9 juin 2014 : je commencerais par affirmer ma volonté de rupture et de changement structurel avec l’essentiel de ce qui a précédé, en rappelant les enjeux majeurs, probablement sans précédents, auxquels la Wallonie tout entière est confrontée dans son nécessaire redéploiement. Ph. DESTATTE, Songe d’un tondeur solitaire : une roadmap pour les pilotes de la Région Wallonie ? Blog PhD2050, Hour-en-Famenne, 9 juin 2014, https://phd2050.wordpress.com/2014/06/09/roadmap/

[4] « J’ai un mea culpa à faire, de façon collective« , Interview de Paul Magnette par Benoît MATHIEU, dans L’Echo, 20 août 2017.

[5] Wallonie : la trajectoire socio-économique, résolument, Namur, le 7 mars 2017, dans L’Echo, 10 mars 2017. http://www.lecho.be/opinions/carte-blanche/Wallonie-la-trajectoire-socio-economique-resolument/9871529